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  • Author or Editor: Klaus Benesch x
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In: Übertragene Anfänge
In: Contesting Environmental Imaginaries
In: Zeitschrift für Religions- und Geistesgeschichte
In: Zeitschrift für Religions- und Geistesgeschichte
In: Gründungsorte der Moderne
In: Space in America
Author:

Taking Henry David Thoreau’s ‘nature’ writing as a point of departure, my paper investigates the complex, often ambiguous relations between concepts of nature and culture in the American Renaissance. I am interested particularly in the uses of natural places as sites of new beginnings: philosophically, culturally, and also politically. If the landscape at Walden Pond figures in Thoreau’s imagination as a site of both individual and national regeneration, the woods along Tackahoe Creek or Chesapeake Bay in Frederick Douglass’s autobiography are equally loaded with cultural meaning. While being translated into art (that is, literary texts) these sites not only become inscribed with complex cultural meanings; they also project ‘anti-geographies’ that question our traditional perception of nature and thereby enable us to envision a new beginning, a reshaping of human relations and American society at large.

In: Perspectives on Mobility
Author:

Taking Henry David Thoreau’s ‘nature’ writing as a point of departure, my paper investigates the complex, often ambiguous relations between concepts of nature and culture in the American Renaissance. I am interested particularly in the uses of natural places as sites of new beginnings: philosophically, culturally, and also politically. If the landscape at Walden Pond figures in Thoreau’s imagination as a site of both individual and national regeneration, the woods along Tackahoe Creek or Chesapeake Bay in Frederick Douglass’s autobiography are equally loaded with cultural meaning. While being translated into art (that is, literary texts) these sites not only become inscribed with complex cultural meanings; they also project ‘anti-geographies’ that question our traditional perception of nature and thereby enable us to envision a new beginning, a reshaping of human relations and American society at large.

In: Perspectives on Mobility