Search Results

Abstract

The story of the elimination of humankind in the great deluge (Genesis 6–9) is one of the most violent narratives in the Hebrew Bible. It not only has a rich history of reception, but also a kind of prequel in the Mesopotamian flood traditions. This contribution focuses on the nature of violence in these traditions and in the biblical Flood Narrative itself, also against the background of its dialogue with Mesopotamian worldviews and its reception in 1 Enoch and Jubilees, as well as in the film Noah (2014). Despite the fact that all of these stories are more or less intertextually related and take a primeval cosmic imbalance as their point of departure, their different descriptions of the incentive for the divine violence in the deluge turns out to be of major importance for their views of the nature of this violence and the relations between the divine and human realms. In addition, the reception history of the biblical text shows that serious interactions with the biblical text itself evoke the question of the nature of the relation between these readings and their biblical source.

In: Violence in the Hebrew Bible

Abstract

The story of the elimination of humankind in the great deluge (Genesis 6–9) is one of the most violent narratives in the Hebrew Bible. It not only has a rich history of reception, but also a kind of prequel in the Mesopotamian flood traditions. This contribution focuses on the nature of violence in these traditions and in the biblical Flood Narrative itself, also against the background of its dialogue with Mesopotamian worldviews and its reception in 1 Enoch and Jubilees, as well as in the film Noah (2014). Despite the fact that all of these stories are more or less intertextually related and take a primeval cosmic imbalance as their point of departure, their different descriptions of the incentive for the divine violence in the deluge turns out to be of major importance for their views of the nature of this violence and the relations between the divine and human realms. In addition, the reception history of the biblical text shows that serious interactions with the biblical text itself evoke the question of the nature of the relation between these readings and their biblical source.

In: Violence in the Hebrew Bible
In: Biblical Hebrew in Context
In: Biblical Hebrew in Context
In: Playing with Leviathan: Interpretation and Reception of Monsters from the Biblical World
In: Torah and Tradition
Ideology and Antiquarian Intent in the Historiography of Israel’s Settlement in Canaan
Current research on ancient historiography concentrates on the relation between history and ideology, while the archaeology of the Southern Levant is more and more viewed as a discipline of its own. What happens when these new directions are applied to the historiography of Israel’s settlement in Canaan?

This study offers a fresh analysis of scholarly debate, a synchronic and diachronic reading of Joshua 9:1—13:7, and a critical evaluation of all the relevant archaeological evidence. This leads to a new historical picture of the Late Bronze – Iron Age transition in the Cisjordanian Southern Levant and to the fascinating conclusion that it was the ideology of the Israelite scribes reworking this episode that instigated them to explore their antiquarian intent.