Search Results

Volumes in the series deal with subjects pertaining to the broad field of Classical reception including, but not limited to reception of art, literature, architecture, history, religion, political thought, and intellectual thought (including volumes on influential Classical scholars and the history of classical scholarship) in later centuries and in various scholarly disciplines. The Series will show a systematic coverage of subjects. Written by the foremost specialists in the respective fields, they aim to provide full-balanced accounts at an advanced level, as well as synthesis of debate and the state of scholarship.

Forthcoming Volumes:


Brill's Companion to the Reception of Vitruvius, edited by Ingrid Rowland
Brill's Companion to the Reception of Xenophon, edited by Dustin Gish
Brill’s Biographical Dictionary of Women Classicists, edited by Judith Hallett and Graham Whitaker
Brill's Companion to the Modern Historiography of Ancient Greece, edited by Alexandra Lianeri and Kostas Vlassopoulos
Brill's Companion to the Reception of Homer: From the Hellenistic Age to Late Antiquity, edited by Christina-Panagiota Manolea
Brill's Companion to the Reception of Ancient Rhetoric, edited by Sophia Papaioannou, Andreas Serafim and Michael Edwards



George Grote’s (1794-1871) extensive publications on ancient Greek history and philosophy remain landmarks in the history of classical scholarship. Since the late 20thcentury, lively interest in the works of Grote has seen his profile revived and his ongoing significance highlighted: he has taken up his rightful place among the most celebrated nineteenth-century classical intellectuals. Grote’s critical engagement with Greek historiography and philosophy revolutionized classical studies in his day – a revolution set against both long-established interpretations and prevailing trends in German Altertumswissenschaft. Twenty-first-century scholarship shows that Grote’s works remain lively, sparkling and relevant, as they offers valuable insights that cut across the intellectual borders of the Victorian age. His diligent scholarship, fascination with evidence and sound judgement, intertwined with intriguing and insightful narrative prose, continue to captivate the attention of modern readers. In Brill’s Companion to George Grote and the Classical Tradition Kyriakos N. Demetriou leads a team of prominent scholars to contextualize, unravel and explore Grote’s works as well as provide a critical assessment of his posthumous legacy.
In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

From the early 1930s to the early 1960s many scholars, whether liberalminded or socialist ideologues, Marxist or scientific positivists, classical scholars or political theorists and historians, have shown a widespread consensus in discrediting and assailing the man and political philosopher Plato. Such an extensive assault led the ‘Platonic Legend’ to an unprecedented crisis. Philosophically, it was a reaction to the undisguised Platonolatry coming from Oxford and the school of the British Idealists. Ideologically, the appropriation of Plato by Nazi apologists fostered further this vehement indictment. But a lot of other causes worked to the same effect. The general anguish and humanistic anxiety on the eve ofWorldWar II and the postwar traumas led scholars to reconsider the meaning of history and historicism, the psychology of the masses and the ethical responsibility of the citizen, the role of propaganda and state education. Such complementary elements converged in sustained anti-Platonic polemics, which in turn provoked a vigorous defence. Here an attempt is made to offer a preliminary survey of this complex debate and to provide a general intellectual framework in terms of which that controversy can be further explored.

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
In: Brill’s Companion to George Grote and the Classical Tradition
In: Brill’s Companion to George Grote and the Classical Tradition
In: Brill’s Companion to George Grote and the Classical Tradition
In: Brill’s Companion to George Grote and the Classical Tradition
Brill's Companion to the Reception of Sophocles offers a comprehensive account of the influence, reception and appropriation of all extant Sophoclean plays, as well as the fragmentary Satyr play The Trackers, from Antiquity to Modernity, across cultures and civilizations, encompassing multiple perspectives and within a broad range of cultural trends and manifestations: literature, intellectual history, visual arts, music, opera and dance, stage and cinematography. A concerted work by an international team of specialists in the field, the volume is addressed to a wide and multidisciplinary readership of classical reception studies, from experts to non-experts. Contributors engage in a vividly and lively interactive dialogue with the Ancient and the Modern, which, while illuminating aspects of ancient drama and highlighting their ever-lasting relevance, offers a thoughtful and layered guide of the human condition.