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Edited by Kyriakos N. Demetriou

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Kyriakos N. Demetriou

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Edited by Kyriakos N. Demetriou

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Edited by Kyriakos N. Demetriou

George Grote’s (1794-1871) extensive publications on ancient Greek history and philosophy remain landmarks in the history of classical scholarship. Since the late 20thcentury, lively interest in the works of Grote has seen his profile revived and his ongoing significance highlighted: he has taken up his rightful place among the most celebrated nineteenth-century classical intellectuals. Grote’s critical engagement with Greek historiography and philosophy revolutionized classical studies in his day – a revolution set against both long-established interpretations and prevailing trends in German Altertumswissenschaft. Twenty-first-century scholarship shows that Grote’s works remain lively, sparkling and relevant, as they offers valuable insights that cut across the intellectual borders of the Victorian age. His diligent scholarship, fascination with evidence and sound judgement, intertwined with intriguing and insightful narrative prose, continue to captivate the attention of modern readers. In Brill’s Companion to George Grote and the Classical Tradition Kyriakos N. Demetriou leads a team of prominent scholars to contextualize, unravel and explore Grote’s works as well as provide a critical assessment of his posthumous legacy.
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Kyriakos N. Demetriou

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Kyriakos N. Demetriou

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Kyriakos N. Demetriou

From the early 1930s to the early 1960s many scholars, whether liberal-minded or socialist ideologues, Marxist or scientific positivists, classical scholars or political theorists and historians, have shown a widespread consensus in discrediting and assailing the man and political philosopher Plato. Such an extensive assault led the ‘Platonic Legend’ to an unprecedented crisis. Philosophically, it was a reaction to the undisguised Platonolatry coming from Oxford and the school of the British Idealists. Ideologically, the appropriation of Plato by Nazi apologists fostered further this vehement indictment. But a lot of other causes worked to the same effect. The general anguish and humanistic anxiety on the eve of World War II and the postwar traumas led scholars to reconsider the meaning of history and historicism, the psychology of the masses and the ethical responsibility of the citizen, the role of propaganda and state education. Such complementary elements converged in sustained anti-Platonic polemics, which in turn provoked a vigorous defence. Here an attempt is made to offer a preliminary survey of this complex debate and to provide a general intellectual framework in terms of which that controversy can be further explored.

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Kyriakos N. Demetriou

From the early 1930s to the early 1960s many scholars, whether liberalminded or socialist ideologues, Marxist or scientific positivists, classical scholars or political theorists and historians, have shown a widespread consensus in discrediting and assailing the man and political philosopher Plato. Such an extensive assault led the ‘Platonic Legend’ to an unprecedented crisis. Philosophically, it was a reaction to the undisguised Platonolatry coming from Oxford and the school of the British Idealists. Ideologically, the appropriation of Plato by Nazi apologists fostered further this vehement indictment. But a lot of other causes worked to the same effect. The general anguish and humanistic anxiety on the eve ofWorldWar II and the postwar traumas led scholars to reconsider the meaning of history and historicism, the psychology of the masses and the ethical responsibility of the citizen, the role of propaganda and state education. Such complementary elements converged in sustained anti-Platonic polemics, which in turn provoked a vigorous defence. Here an attempt is made to offer a preliminary survey of this complex debate and to provide a general intellectual framework in terms of which that controversy can be further explored.

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Polis was founded in 1977 to provide a forum for publication to scholars specializing in what was then a neglected sub-field – ancient Greek political thought. Over the years Polis evolved into a fully-fledged academic journal that publishes material of interest to those who study ancient Greek political thought broadly understood, whether they do so as classicists, ancient historians, philosophers, or political scientists. The Polis also welcomes articles on the reception of ancient political thought in Europe, America, or elsewhere.
Since its inception the journal speaks for no particular perspective or methodology and it is devoted to the publication of original papers, even though extensive literature reviews, critiques of contemporary research and review essays are also included.
All submissions are sent to two referees and normally an editorial decision is taken within 3 months from the time of submission. While Polis primarily features contributions written in English, submissions in French and German are also welcome.
The views and opinions expressed in peer-reviewed articles published in Polis are those of the authors and do not reflect the position of Journal.
Polis appears in two issues per annual volume (summer and winter).
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