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Author: Kyu Seop Kim
Despite scholars’ ongoing historical and sociological investigations into the ancient family, the right and the status of the firstborn son have been rarely explored by NT scholars, and this topic has not attracted the careful attention that it deserves. This work offers a study of the meaning of the firstborn son in the New Testament paying specific attention to the concept of primogeniture in the Old Testament and Jewish literature. This study argues that primogeniture was a unique institution in Jewish society, and that the title of the firstborn son indicates his access to the promise of Israel, and is associated with the right of the inheritance (i.e., primogeniture) including the Land and the special status of Israel.
In: The Firstborn Son in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity
In: The Firstborn Son in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity
In: The Firstborn Son in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity
In: The Firstborn Son in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity
In: The Firstborn Son in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity
Author: Kyu Seop Kim

Abstract

Despite its potential significance, scholars gloss over the concept of the firstborn son in Joseph and Aseneth with little regard to its meaning. The title of the firstborn son (πρωτότοκος) reminds us of the rivalry and the conflict between Israel and Egypt in Exodus. In particular, the death of the firstborn son of Pharaoh evokes the destruction of the firstborn Egyptians in Exodus. One of the main motifs in Joseph and Aseneth is the rivalry between Joseph and the firstborn son of Pharaoh; Joseph the firstborn son is described as the victor of the competition. The death of the firstborn son of Pharaoh alludes to the destruction of the firstborn sons of the Egyptians in Exodus 11. Therefore, the motif of the firstborn son in Joseph and Aseneth refers to Israel’s self-perception with regard to the superiority of the Jews over the gentiles (or Egyptians) as seen in Exodus.

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism
Author: Kyu Seop Kim

Abstract

In this article, we observe that in Ptolemaic testament papyri the full proprietorship of the patrimony was not immediately transferred to heirs, and that, by διαθήκη, heirs could acquire only the “usufruct” (the right to use the land) during the lifetime of the testator. From this perspective, this study proposes that the translators of LXX Genesis selected the Greek equivalent διαθήκη for the Hebrew word בְּרִית because the term διαθήκη referred to the bestowal of the usufruct. In LXX Genesis, Abraham, Isaac, and all living beings did not possess the proprietorship of the land by διαθήκη even though they could use the land.

In: Vetus Testamentum