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In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
Author: Lars Vilhelmsen

Abstract

The genera Chalinus Konow and Mocsarya Konow are revised. Eight species are recognised in Chalinus: C. berlandi Guiglia, C. braunsi (Enslin), C. haugi du Buysson, C. imperialis (Westwood), C. orientalis Guiglia, C. purpureiventris Cameron, C. somalicus Guiglia, C. timnaensis Kraus. Chalinus balianii Guiglia is proposed as a new synonym of C. berlandi Guiglia, C. schulthessi Guiglia as a new synonym of C. braunsi (Enslin), and the synonymy of C. congoensis Guiglia with C. imperialis (Westwood) is reestablished. Two species are recognised in Mocsarya: M. metallica (Mocsáry); M. syriaca Benson. Two nominal species, Oryssus oberthueri Saussure and Oryssus plumicornis Guérin-Menneville are treated as species inquirendae in Chalinus. Keys, redescriptions and distribution maps are provided for all recognised species.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Sambia succinica gen. et sp.n. from Eocene Baltic amber is described and illustrated. It is apparently the first amber fossil that can be definitively assigned to Tenthredininae. It displays two diagnostic forewing characters for this subfamily: having a bend distally in vein R and the junctions of veins M and Rs + M with vein R being some distance from each other. The variance and possible transitions between the anal vein configurations among the genera in Tenthredininae is briefly discussed.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

The genera Argentophrynopus Vilhelmsen & Smith, gen. n., Guiglia Benson, Kulcania Benson, Ophrella Middlekauff, Ophrynon Middlekauff, Ophrynopus Konow, and Stirocorsia Konow of the wasp family Orussidae are revised. This group of genera of Orussidae occurs from southern United States to Chile and in Japan, southeastern Asia, and Australia. In total, 27 species are recognized, including Argentophrynopus enigmus Vilhelmsen & Smith, sp. n., A. gauldi Vilhelmsen & Smith, sp. n., Guiglia rubicunda Schmidt, sp. n., Ophrynopus carinatus Vilhelmsen & Smith, sp. n., and Ophrynopus hansoni Vilhelmsen & Smith, sp. n. Guiglia queenslandensis coronata Rayment is considered a new junior synonym of G. sericatus (Mocsáry); G. aureola Benson is considered a species inquirenda. Kulcania tomentosa (Middlekauff), comb. n., is transferred from Ophrynopus. Ophrynopus philippinensis Guiglia is considered a new junior synonym of Stirocorsia kohli Konow; Ophrynella rossi Yasumatsu, syn. n., and Oryssus trifasciatus Cameron, rev. stat., are both considered junior synonyms of Stirocorsia maculipennis (Smith). Keys and distribution maps of all recognized species are provided, as well as descriptions of all genera.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

Three new species of Ophrynon Middlekauff, 1983, O. dominiqueae, O. martini and O. patricki, are added to the only species known previously, O. levigatus Middlekauff, 1983. All species are described, illustrated and keyed. Cladistic analyses under different weighting conditions retrieved Ophrynon as monophyletic, but the topologies produced for the higher ophrynopine taxa are quite variable. The possible closest relatives of Ophrynon are Argentophrynopus Vilhelmsen & D.R. Smith, 2002 and Kulcania Benson, 1935. The internal phylogeny of Ophrynon is O. martini + (O. levigatus + (O. dominiqueae + O. patricki)). The distribution of Ophrynon is restricted to central and southern California. Supposedly, the species belong to the californo-eremial distribution type and are the result of a comparatively recent speciation process.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
An Identification Manual of Insects, Spiders and their Allies
In The Greenland Entomofauna an international team of 64 taxonomic specialists provide for the first time a richly illustrated guide to the identification of the ≈1200 species of Hexapods/Insects, Arachnids and Myriapods so far known to occur in the country.

While the composition, origin and adaptations of the Greenland fauna has always been a challenge to biogeographers and ecologists/ecophysiologists, the provision of a tool for detailed identification of its constituent species is now particularly timely, since global climate change will expectedly have a particularly noticeable impact on biota at high latitudes. This obviously renders the feasibility of monitoring distributional range shifts of the principal components of this biota a matter of some urgency.

Contributors are: Achterberg, Cornelius van; Ahola, Matti; Barták, Miroslav; Behan-Pelletier, Valerie; Bird, Jeremy M.; Bøg, Katrine; Brodo, Fenja; Buhl, Peter N.; Dahl, Christine; Disney, R. Henry L.; Dittmar, Katharina; Fjellberg, Arne; Gammelmo, Øivind; Forshage, Mattias; Gerecke, Reinhard; Gertsson, Carl-Axel; Haastriter, Michael M.L.; Haenni, Jean-Paul; Heie, Ole E.; Heraty, John M.; Hodgson, Chris; Hodkinson, Ian D.; Horsfield, David; Huber, John T.; Jaschoff, Matthias; Jensen, Frank; Johanson, Kjell A.; Jussila, Reijo; Karsholt, Ole; Krzeminska, Ewa; Lantsov, Vladimir I.; Láska, Pavel; Lindegaard, Claus; Lyneborg, Leif (†); Makarova, Olga; Marusik, Yura M.; Mathis, Wayne N.; Mazánek, Libor; Michelsen, Verner; Munk, Thorkild (†); Murphy, William L.; Nielsen, Søren A.; Nielsen, Tore R.; Noyes, John S.; Oosterbroek, Pjotr; Ozerov, Andrey L.; Pape, Thomas; Pinto, John D.; Pollet, Marc; Rindal, Eirik; Rohácek, Jindrich; Simonsen, Thomas J.; Smith, Vincent S.; Söli, Geir; Starý, Jaroslav; Strassen, Richard zur; Svensson, Bo. W.; Vilhelmsen, Lars; Vilkamaa, Pekka; Wilson, Michael; Zatwarnicki, Tadeusz