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A Scholarly Edition of Andrés de Li’s Thesoro de la passion (1494) is the first new edition of this early Castilian Passion text in five hundred years. Originally published in 1494 by the prolific Zaragozan printer Pablo Hurus, this beautifully illustrated devotional offers the modern reader a glimpse into the complex social world of late fifteenth-century Spain. Li’s converso identity permeates his retelling of the Passion through expositions on hypocrisy, anti-Semitism, and false faith. This new, modernized edition of the Thesoro de la passion dramatically illustrates the unique confluence of social, religious, and cultural forces present during the emergence of Spain’s national identity via analyses of the Thesoro’s Classical, Castilian, and Catalan sources, its importance as an early printed book, Li’s portrayal of the Virgin Mary, Christ, and the Passion events, and the importance of Li’s converso perspectives throughout the work.
Editor: Laura Delbrugge
In Self-Fashioning and Assumptions of Identity in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia, editor Laura Delbrugge and contributors Jaume Aurell, David Gugel, Michael Harney, Daniel Hartnett, Mark Johnston, Albert Lloret, Montserrat Piera, Zita Rohr, Núria Silleras-Fernández, Caroline Smith, Wendell P. Smith, and Lesley Twomey explore the applicability of Stephen Greenblatt's self-fashioning theory, framed in Elizabethan England, to medieval and early modern Portugal, Aragon, and Castile. Chapters examine self-fashioning efforts by monarchs, religious converts, nobles, commoners, and clergy in the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries to establish the presence of self-identity creation in many new contexts beyond that explored in Greenblatt's Renaissance Self-Fashioning, greatly expanding the understanding of self-fashioning on diverse aspects of identity creation in late medieval and early modern Iberia.
A Scholarly Edition of the Gamaliel (Valencia: Juan Jofre, 1525) is a modernized edition of a late medieval devotional that formed part of the narrative tradition of La Vengeance de Nostre-Seigneur, which gained popularity from the twelfth century. The 1525 compendium Gamaliel is comprised of seven loosely related texts, including the Passion of Christ, the Destruction of Jerusalem, the biographies of Lazarus, Mary, and Martha, and the Slaughter of the Innocents. The Gamaliel was reproduced in over a dozen Spanish and Catalan printed editions in the first half of the sixteenth century until it was banned by the Spanish Inquisition beginning in 1558, likely due to its anonymous authorship and apocryphal content.
In: Marginal Voices
In: Self-Fashioning and Assumptions of Identity in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia
In: Self-Fashioning and Assumptions of Identity in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia
In: Self-Fashioning and Assumptions of Identity in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia
In: A Scholarly Edition of the Gamaliel (Valencia: Juan Jofre, 1525)
In: A Scholarly Edition of the Gamaliel (Valencia: Juan Jofre, 1525)
In: A Scholarly Edition of the Gamaliel (Valencia: Juan Jofre, 1525)