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Laura Lundy

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Focusing both on critical leadership and practical policy development, the articles in the preeminent International Journal of Children's Rights reflect the perspectives of a broad range of disciplines and contribute to a greater understanding of children's rights and their impact on the concept and development of childhood.
The journal deploys the insights and methodologies of all relevant disciplines, including law, legal and political theory, psychology, psychiatry, educational theory, sociology, social administration and social work, health, social anthropology, economics, theology, and history to further children's rights in all parts of the world.

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Does Exactly What it Says on the Tin?

A Critical Analysis and Alternative Conceptualisation of the So-called “General Principles” of the Convention on the Rights of the Child

Karl Hanson and Laura Lundy

The four general principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child are one of its most cited features. This article tracks the evolution of the “general principles” in the drafting process of the Convention and the Committee’s determination of the content of its 1991 reporting guidelines. This is followed by an analysis of the approach to the “general principles” that the Committee has adopted in its monitoring and reporting processes and General Comments. It concludes that these four articles are not necessarily “general” nor “principles” and suggests how the concept of a set of cross-cutting standards might evolve and perhaps be reformulated in ways that are faithful to both the text of the Convention and subsequent understanding and practice.

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Laura Lundy and Helen Stalford

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Laura Lundy and Helen Stalford

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Laura Lundy and Helen Stalford

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Does Exactly What it Says on the Tin?

A Critical Analysis and Alternative Conceptualisation of the So-called “General Principles” of the Convention on the Rights of the Child

Karl Hanson and Laura Lundy

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Laura Lundy, Ursula Kilkelly and Bronagh Byrne

Incorporation in law is recognised as key to the implementation of the UNCRC. This article considers the ways in which a variety of countries have chosen to incorporate the CRC, drawing on a study conducted by the authors for UNICEF-UK. It categorises the different approaches adopted into examples of direct incorporation (where the CRC forms part of domestic law) and indirect incorporation (where there are legal obligations which encourage its incorporation); and full incorporation (where the CRC has been wholly incorporated in law) and partial incorporation (where elements of the CRC have been incorporated). Drawing on evidence and interviews conducted during field visits in six of the countries studied, it concludes that children’s rights are better protected – at least in law if not also in practice – in countries that have given legal status to the CRC in a systematic way and have followed this up by establishing the necessary systems to support, monitor and enforce the implementation of CRC rights.