Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 22 items for

  • Author or Editor: Lee L. Brice x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In: Aspects of Ancient Institutions and Geography
In: Brill's Companion to Insurgency and Terrorism in the Ancient Mediterranean
Series Editor:
Warfare in the Ancient Mediterranean World will disseminate recent research in volumes organized topically for easy reference while also setting the standard for such anthologies by aiming above the introductory level. The intended audience includes both scholarly specialists and non-specialists. Future volumes will not only draw upon current research, but will provide a venue for new and recent methodologies for understanding warfare in the ancient world. In this way the series will be a resource for a non-specialist audience too. Regardless of whether war is actually the “father” of any field, military history has remained popular over the centuries, both with authors and readers.
Author:

Abstract

Although most readers think of the Roman army as a most disciplined institution, it was occasionally subject to breakdowns of discipline. While we have always acknowledged the military instability of the third century, we now also recognize that the military of the late Republic and early Principate was more inclined to mutiny and insubordination than was formerly accepted. This chapter is a revision of previous work focused on how after incidents of mutinies, reinstitution of social control by Roman commanders of this earlier period kept restive military units and soldiers from becoming a threat to stability. Some of the original observations and conclusions are in need of revision due to further work on the problems of military unrest. In addition to addressing the historiography and methodology of examining mutinies, this chapter includes examination of mutinies in 49 and 44 BCE and 14 CE. Based on these case studies, we can distinguish common strategies officers employed for successful resolution of indiscipline and how some commanders fell short. This examination is also useful for revealing why mutinies did not typically become a threat to stability.

In: People and Institutions in the Roman Empire
Author:

Abstract

This chapter considers the ways in which the contributions intersect in their coverage of topics related to diet and logistics. The first part considers dietary topics. Important points include the similar nature of military and civic diets and drink, not just in standard consumables, but also the way diet reflects culture and status. Supplements to the standard ration were available, often as either exotic or luxury goods or reflecting the regions in which the soldiers were stationed. The second part of the chapter reviews ancient logistics. Not surprisingly, ancient states succeeded more often than not in supplying their armies in a varieties of ways, but in all cases logistical limitations impacted in warfare. Those states that were most successful mastered logistical demands within the ancient context through planning and wealth. Part three considers the two case studies that focus on literary and epigraphic sources for logistics. Both chapters reveal the potential of reexamining written evidence in light of logistics and diet. The final part reviews opportunities for further work. Key among these areas is a reexamination of Donald Engel’s work on Macedonian logistics. Also, provisioning for the non-combatant members of the military communities (e.g., families, attendants, etc) that accompanied armies comes up for discussion as does the need for considering environmental connections and impacts. The chapter closes with a brief consideration of logistics’ place in ancient warfare.

In: Brill’s Companion to Diet and Logistics in Greek and Roman Warfare
In: Aspects of Ancient Institutions and Geography
In: Aspects of Ancient Institutions and Geography
In: Aspects of Ancient Institutions and Geography
In: Aspects of Ancient Institutions and Geography