Author: Leechin Heng

Abstract

This chapter presents findings from a doctoral study that focuses on an attempt by a set of teaching practitioners to re\conceptualize what inclusive education might mean via the development and facilitation of a new initial teacher education (ITE) program in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ). The purpose is to situate inclusion at the center of the program that recognizes classroom students’ rights to an education that is inclusive and equitable to their sociocultural contexts and prior knowledge. Through the lens of critical discourse analysis (CDA), the study investigates the social space enabled by government funding in a new postgraduate ITE program – a site regulated by dominant interests and agendas. This chapter will draw on data obtained through an 11-month qualitative case study process undertaken for the research.

In: Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right?
Overarching principles of human rights which shore up a nearly 30-year history of international efforts to develop educational systems that are responsive to the needs of all. Arguably the most widely recognised international inclusive education policy, the Salamanca Statement released in 1994 from the United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), recognised that every child has a basic right to education.

In so doing, however, it drew a line around special needs as a particular emphasis, in globalising efforts towards equal opportunity through decrees for first principles of universally attainable privileges. Considered a watershed moment in global responses to educational exclusion, the Salamanca Statement was core to increasing awareness among nations of the need for fostering more inclusive education policy and practice. Nonetheless, the liberal ideologies that frame human rights in inclusive education are seldom called into question, despite perpetual marginalisation and disadvantage post Salamanca.

Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right? brings the many together to consider educational democracy at a moment in global history where the political order fractures populations, and the displacement of socio-economic participation is displayed in every news bulletin – true, fake or otherwise. Under these conditions, the significance of academic activism, wherein diverse perspectives, methodologies and theoretical approaches are put to work to increase equity in education, has perhaps never been so stark. Across the collection the combined chapters engage with researchers, students, education professionals and leaders, advocacy organisations, and people experiencing exclusion and consider human rights in relation to inclusive education.

Contributors are: Kate Anderson, Alison Baker, Tim Corcoran, Edwin Creely, Jenny Duke, Peng-Sim Eng, Leechin Heng, Anna Kilderry, Sarah Lambert, Bec Marland, Julianne Moss, Philippa Moylan, Mia Nosrat, Joanne O’Mara, Jo Raphael, Bethany Rice, Andrew Riordan, Amathullah Shakeeb, Roger Slee, Kitty te Riele, Matthew K. E. Thomas, Peter Walker, Scott Welsh, Ben Whitburn, Julie White and Michalinos Zembylas.

Abstract

This chapter explores the nature of what it means to identify as more than human when augmentation, manipulation, reconstitution and rejection of the minority body may be realized. In the aftermath, we are left to be rendered more than human and in need of more than human rights. If the body and the mind are understood as algorithmic rewritable constructs, what does this mean for a world that struggles with difference? In education, tired structures, half measures, and band-aid approaches which typically fail to grapple with the rights of all children and come at an unconscionable human cost. This text attempts to respond to some of the challenges that emerge when we don’t attend to the conceptualization of our meaning when we say that inclusive education is a Right, right?

In: Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right?

Abstract

Discrimination, bias, inequality, and inequity, are terms that are all too commonly associated with education for those obscured in the margins and excluded from the main. Herein, we attempt to chorus the voices that have remained in the shadowy discourses of inclusive education. Further, we fuse diverse sociological perspectives and examine points of friction, murmuration, and interplay. Through this, we endeavor to move beyond empty rhetoric and what has become the canonical assumptions of inclusive education. Instead, we turn to considerations of multiplicity; in doing so we take up arms at the intersections of the impact of neoliberalism and artificial intelligence, poverty and regional education, and finally the utilization of camouflage to hide the social realities of segregation. Through these narrative junctures, we find solace in the capacity to call out exclusion, irregularity, and oppression and complicate the underside of inclusion which scratches at common-sensical notions that inclusive education is a Right, right?

In: Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right?