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In this monograph Leslie J. Francis reviews and assesses the contributions made by the individual differences tradition of psychology over the past 50 years to research in religious education. In this context religious education is conceived broadly to embrace what takes place in schools, within religious communities, and within households across the age span. Topics include:

• the centrality of the attitudinal dimension of religion;
• the place of personality in the individual differences tradition;
• sex as a core individual difference in religion;
• the consequences of individual differences in religious affect;
• the role of church schools and the role of the family in religious nurture;
• the factors that account for individual differences in attitude toward religious diversity;
• the relevance of the individual differences tradition for adult religious education;
• the implications of the individual differences tradition for biblical hermeneutics and discipleship learning.
In: Journal of Empirical Theology

This paper differentiates between two functions in education of Anglican Schools. The domestic function focuses on the inward looking concern to equip the children of the church to take their place in the Christian community. The general function focuses on the outward looking concern to serve the nation through its children. The paper puts the discussion about these functions against the background of the criticism on Church schools. For the three decades between 1970 and 1998 the Anglican Church emphasized, implicitly and explicitly, the Church's general role in education. A new prominence is suggested for the Church's domestic role in education at the end of the 1990s and the beginning of the new millennium.

In: International Journal of Education and Religion
In: Acts in Practice
In: The Farewell Discourses in Practice
In: Empirical Theology in Texts and Tables