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Brill, in collaboration with The Museum of Jewish Heritage (New York) and Continuum (New York) proudly presents The Encyclopaedia of Judaism.
The Encyclopaedia of Judaism provides a definitive account of contemporary Judaism and a reliable picture of a tradition of nearly four thousand years. A full and detailed index provides ready-reference for facts, and the systematic articles set forth highly readable accounts of the entire range of Judaic systems of belief and behavior put forth over time and in our own time. It is written for people from all backgrounds, scholars and general readers alike.
When the editors completed the initial three volumes of The Encyclopaedia of Judaism, they found satisfaction in having covered the more than one hundred topics. But they also realized that many other important topics remained to be set forth in a systematic way. This led to the Supplements One and Two, offering new inquiries into the history, practices, and theology of the religion, Judaism.
The Encyclopaedia of Judaism CD-ROM comprises all five published volumes of this award-winning overview of Judaism. Meant for easy searching with additional photographs, the CD-ROM is a indispensable addition to the printed volumes, now already comprising 2,500 pages and 150 entries.

The Encyclopaedia of Judaism has been selected as CHOICE's Outstanding Academic Title for 2000 and by the American Library Association as Outstanding Reference Source 2001.
This book answers the following question for Judaism: among all the things that happened in antiquity, what are the events that, seen from the perspective of the world that would endure, turn out to shape the long future? How did axiological events identify the focal points of the unfolding religious system, Judaism, in its formulation by the rabbinic sages of ancient times? This is the system that originated, in its own telling, with God’s teaching to Moses at Sinai in the Torah, in written and traditional form. Of all that happened to the Jews in the millennium from the formation of the Pentateuch (“Moses”) to the end of the formative age (“Muhammad”), the particular Judaism that emerged as normative responded to only a select few and did so within a logic all its own. Here we identify those definitive events of danger and opportunity — crisis — and the focal points that they highlighted.
The Encyclopaedia of Judaism provides a full and reliable account of Judaism, beginning in ancient Israelite times and extending to our own day. About Judaism, the religion, its diverse history, literature, beliefs past and present, observances and practices, and place in the context of society and culture, this is what we know. All principal topics required for the systematic description of Judaism as a religion the world view, way of life, theory of the social entity constituted by the faithful are addressed here.
The Encyclopaedia of Judaism provides a definitive account of contemporary Judaism and a reliable picture of a tradition of nearly four thousand years. A full and detailed index provides ready-reference for facts, and the systematic articles set forth highly readable accounts of the entire range of Judaic systems of belief and behavior put forth over time and in our own time. It is written for people from all backgrounds, scholars and general readers alike.
When the editors completed the initial three volumes of The Encyclopaedia of Judaism, they found satisfaction in having covered the more than one hundred topics. But they also realized that many other important topics remained to be set forth in a systematic way. This led to new inquiries into the history, practices, and theology of the religion, Judaism. Specialists in all these fields were found and the result is more than ninety new studies, which will appear in three Supplements. Supplement One is published in 2002, and Supplement Three is anticipated for 2004.

Published by Brill, Leiden & Continuum, New York.
The Encyclopaedia of Judaism provides a full and reliable account of Judaism, beginning in ancient Israelite times and extending to our own day. About Judaism, the religion, its diverse history, literature, beliefs past and present, observances and practices, and place in the context of society and culture, this is what we know. All principal topics required for the systematic description of Judaism as a religion the world view, way of life, theory of the social entity constituted by the faithful are addressed here.
The Encyclopaedia of Judaism provides a definitive account of contemporary Judaism and a reliable picture of a tradition of nearly four thousand years. A full and detailed index provides ready-reference for facts, and the systematic articles set forth highly readable accounts of the entire range of Judaic systems of belief and behavior put forth over time and in our own time. It is written for people from all backgrounds, scholars and general readers alike.
When the editors completed the initial three volumes of The Encyclopaedia of Judaism, they found satisfaction in having covered the more than one hundred topics. But they also realized that many other important topics remained to be set forth in a systematic way. This led to new inquiries into the history, practices, and theology of the religion, Judaism. Specialists in all these fields were found and the result is more than ninety new studies, of which the first thirty-two are in the present volume.

Published by Brill, Leiden & Continuum, New York.
The Annual of Rabbinic Judaism: Ancient, Medieval, and Modern, the first and only annual with a special focus on Rabbinic Judaism, will publish principal articles, essays on method and criticism, systematic debates ( Auseinandersetzungen), occasional notes, long book reviews, reviews of issues of scholarly journals, assessments of textbooks and instructional materials, and other media of academic discourse, scholarly and educational alike.
The Annual fills the gap in the study of Judaism, the religion, which is left by the prevailing division of Rabbinic Judaism into the standard historical periods (ancient, medieval, modern) that in fact do not apply; and by the common treatment of Judaism in bits and pieces (philosophy, mysticism, law, homiletics, institutional history, for example), which obscures the fundamental unity and continuity of Rabbinic Judaism from beginning to the present.

The 2000 issue contains articles by Ithamar Gruenwald, Dvora Weisberg, Jacob Neusner, José Faur, Simcha Fishbane, Norman Solomon, and Dov Schwartz, as well as reviews by Jacob Neusner, Herbert W. Basser, and Günter Stemberger.
The Annual of Rabbinic Judaism, Ancient, Medieval, and Modern, the first and only annual with a special focus on Rabbinic Judaism, will publish principal articles, essays on method and criticism, systematic debates ( Auseindersetzungen), occasional notes, long book reviews, reviews of issues of scholarly journals, assessments of textbooks and instructional materials, and other media of academic discourse, scholarly and educational alike.
The Annual fills the gap in the study of Judaism, the religion, which is left by the prevailing division of Rabbinic Judaism into the standard historical periods (ancient, medieval, modern) that in fact do not apply; and by the common treatment of Judaism in bits and pieces (philosophy, mysticism, law, homiletics, institutional history, for example), which obscures the fundamental unity and continuity of Rabbinic Judaism from beginning to the present.
The Annual of Rabbinic Judaism, Ancient, Medieval, and Modern, the first and only year book to focus upon Rabbinic Judaism in particular, will publish principal articles, essays on method and criticism, systematic debates ( Auseindersetzungen), occasional notes, long book reviews, reviews of issues of scholarly journals, assessments of textbooks and instructional materials, and other media of academic discourse, scholarly and educational alike.
The Annual fills the gap in the study of Judaism, the religion, which is left by the prevailing division of Rabbinic Judaism among the standard historical periods (ancient, medieval, modern) that in fact do not apply; and by the common treatment of the Judaism in bits and pieces (philosophy, mysticism, law homiletics, institutional history, for example). Scholarship presently obscures the fundamental unity and continuity of Rabbinic Judaism from beginning to the present.