Ji Li

Series:

Chi Jian and Li Li Ji

The China Champion Program (CCP) is a special graduate program of the Beijing Sport University. It provides a select group of China’s elite athletes with one year of time to study in a major university in the United States focusing on English language training, science, education, social-culture events, and professional skills pursuant to their own fields. Since the inaugural class of 2010, six classes of CCP have graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. The major financial source of the program comes from the China Scholarship Council, providing international travel and living cost, whereas the hosting universities and local communities has offered generous support for their language training, courses and social interactions. The athletes and coaches graduated from the CCP have expressed overwhelmingly positive feedback and appreciation. Many of the graduates have achieved their career goals and attributed their accomplishments to the experiences gained from the CCP. Although the CCP has provided China’s top athletes with an opportunity for their post-competitive professional development, the population who received this benefit is still small and limited to the top tier. This unique model of supplementary education for China’s athletes may reflect some interesting characteristics of the Chinese educational system and the contribution an American university can made in this collaboration.

Series:

Edited by Christopher J. Johnstone and Li Li Ji

Over the past two decades, international cooperation in higher education has become the norm in China and around the world. To exemplify these relationships, this edited volume devotes individual chapters to case studies of China-U.S. international higher education partnerships focused on 1) Collaborative graduate programs; 2) Research collaborations; 3) Student mobility; 4) Multi-institution collaborations; 5) Cultural exchanges; and 6) Branch campuses. These case studies will illuminate the strategies, challenges, and perceived benefits of cross-national collaboration. Case studies are bookended with introductory and concluding chapters that link cooperative activities to theory on diplomacy (including Western “soft diplomacy” and Chinese five principles of “peaceful coexistence” narratives); internationalization of higher education; and reflections on student and scholar mobility between Chinese and US institutions.

Series:

Edited by Christopher J. Johnstone and Li Li Ji

Over the past two decades, international cooperation in higher education has become the norm in China and around the world. To exemplify these relationships, this edited volume devotes individual chapters to case studies of China-U.S. international higher education partnerships focused on 1) Collaborative graduate programs; 2) Research collaborations; 3) Student mobility; 4) Multi-institution collaborations; 5) Cultural exchanges; and 6) Branch campuses. These case studies will illuminate the strategies, challenges, and perceived benefits of cross-national collaboration. Case studies are bookended with introductory and concluding chapters that link cooperative activities to theory on diplomacy (including Western “soft diplomacy” and Chinese five principles of “peaceful coexistence” narratives); internationalization of higher education; and reflections on student and scholar mobility between Chinese and US institutions.

Guiyao Tang, Ji Li and Xinran Wang

This paper examines the effect of Confucian cultural value on the relationship between multimarket contact and two dimensions of firm performance, i.e., firms’ innovation and profitability. It is hypothesized that firms with a high level of multimarket contact are more likely to show mutual forbearance towards their competitors, which in turn influences their innovative behavior and financial performance. Taking into account the possible moderating effects of Confucian cultural value, we also hypothesize that the effect of multimarket contact is more pronounced among firms from the Confucian culture. In other words, it is argued that firms from the Confucian culture are more likely to innovate and obtain better financial performance. Empirical tests were conducted after the hypotheses, and the findings support the arguments on multimarket contacts and mutual forbearance hypotheses. Through facilitating tacit collusion, multimarket contact does seem to help create superior economic performance.

Xia Zhang, Gaoyong Li and Ji-Ye Mao

This paper presents an exploratory case study to examine information systems development (ISD) processes in a low methodology maturity environment, and to understand the role of control mechanisms in project success. The case involves the development of a large scale information system, which progressed without a fully-defined “master plan” or much reliance on formal methodologies, but was successfully launched nevertheless despite some delay. Data were analyzed from the lens of control theory. Results show that clan control emerged as a dominant form of informal control in a high complexity and low methodology maturity environment. Moreover, end-to-end user participation through collocation with the developers served as effective outcome control, which appeared to be a critical success factor. The reliance on behavior control was marginal, although the project manager’s effective leadership as a form of self-control also played a role in project success. This work contributes to ISD research in general and the development of a control perspective to user participation in ISD.

Rui Zhang, Dianlei Han, Qiaoli Ji, Guoyu Li, Xian Li and Jianqiao Li

Abstract

When studying the gait of pheasants, an intermittent-flight bird, it is necessary to take into account changes in the gaits and hindlimb joint angles resulting from increases of speed. In this study, pheasant locomotion postures were recorded on a speed-variable treadmill with high-speed cameras. Firstly, kinematic analysis showed that the stride cycle of pheasants decreased and the stride length increased with increasing speed. The duty factor also decreased, but was less than 0.5 in only about 10% of measurements. Thus, pheasants are more inclined to choose the grounded running or walking gait in laboratory situations. Secondly, changes in the tarsometatarso-phalangeal joint angle and the intertarsal joint angle at touch-down, mid-stance and lift-off concomitant with speed variation were studied. Tarsometatarso-phalangeal joint angle was found not to be significantly affected by changes in speed, but changed over larger ranges than the intertarsal joint angle. Thirdly, the continuous changes in the joint angles were studied during a complete stride cycle. The curves shifted leftward with increasing speed. Finally, the changes at four main positions were analyzed with increasing speed.

Fangshuo Ji, Haiyan Liu, Chao Li and Zhencai Yang

The ratio of RNA to DNA is widely used to reflect instantaneous animal growth; however, little is known about its daily variation. Photoperiod can modify expression of internal clocks, providing animals with the flexibility to adapt to variable environments. This study focused on the influence of photoperiod regimes on the daily variation of RNA:DNA ratio in Pelodiscus sinensis. We randomly divided 260 turtles into four groups: constant dark (0L), 8 h light with 16 h dark (8L), 12 h light with 12 h dark (12L), and 16 h light with 8 h dark (16L). Turtles were housed under specific photoperiods for 15 days (fed for first 10 days then starved for 5 days), thereafter we sampled the tissues every 2 h for 24 h. We dissected forelimb muscles and measured the concentration of isolated RNA and DNA. There were rhythmic variations in the RNA:DNA ratio, even in turtles under continuous darkness, indicating that P. sinensis has circadian RNA:DNA ratio rhythms, and the rhythms were likely controlled by internal clocks. Additionally, the acrophase was advanced by two hours in constant darkness in contrast to the other three photoperiods, indicating that the photoperiod considerably modified the rhythm set by the internal clocks. Notably, the RNA:DNA ratio differed between photoperiod regimes, with 0L > 16L > 8L ≈ 12L, indicating the photoperiod may be a seasonal indicator for turtles to synchronize their physiological processes with environmental variations.