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Liudmila V. Charipova

Abstract

Drawing on the surviving lists of books from the private collection of Peter Mohyla, the Greek Orthodox Metropolitan of Kiev in 1633-1646, the crucial period that followed the restoration of his confession’s legal status in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the article examines the place of Western monastic works in shaping the spiritual and doctrinal parameters of Orthodox reform. Beginning in the Archdiocese of Kiev, it subsequently spread to other branches of the Eastern Church, which remained outside communion with Rome in the seventeenth century: Greek, Moldavian, and Russian. The article establishes vital links between the process of Orthodox renewal and the European movement for religious change and considers the case for the applicability of the confessionalization model as a suitable analytical framework for Orthodox religious reforms.

Liudmila V. Charipova

Maria-Magdalena Mazepa, the natural mother of Hetman Ivan Mazepa and mother superior of an elite women’s convent in Kyiv, played a prominent role as her son’s informal political aide and confidante from the start of his hetmanship in 1687 until her death in 1707. Her forceful personality and willingness to engage with the power struggles in the Hetmanate provoked social resentment, which culminated in a formally recorded witchcraft accusation. Drawing on broader East Slavic and older Byzantine models, the article explores the charge of sorcery against Maria-Magdalena placed within the cultural and political context of the Ukrainian Hetmanate at the turn of the 17th and 18th centuries.