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  • Author or Editor: Lluis Oviedo x
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Several authors in the field of the cognitive science of religion have resorted to ‘dual-process’ models in their own developments. These models distinguish between non-conscious (fast, intuitive, and automatic) and conscious (slow, reflective and controlled) forms of religious reasoning. Most of the published studies focus only on the first of those two processes when dealing with religion. The present pages offer a summary of the current state of dual-process research, their application to religion to the date, and a plea for their broader use, aimed at building a more integrated view of religion as a combination of both cognitive dimensions. The developments on ‘heuristics’ might contribute to a better understanding of several features of the religious mind.

In: Method & Theory in the Study of Religion
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Abstract

Religion is a multifaceted phenomenon calling for a multidisciplinary approach. Research programs ignoring such level of complexity could incur in forms of reductionism, becoming unable to account for many aspects of religious mind and behavior. The thesis exposed in the articles of Wiebe and Martin awake that suspicion: the first one because of the many ways different religions cope with illness and contagion; the second, as a consequence of the stress and anxiety linked to several religious forms, becoming functional aspects to their implementation.

In: Method & Theory in the Study of Religion
In: Method & Theory in the Study of Religion
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Abstract

This article proposes a new perspective for theology calling for fresh studies on religion and coping, resilience, wellbeing and flourishing. These studies have grown far from theological areas and could be seen as quite strange to that tradition, its methods, and views. However, theology can learn a lot from these new studies when trying to update its message of salvation, endowing it with a more explicit content and can offer interesting points to other treaties, like Christian Anthropology and Practical Theology. To that end the article reports and briefly reviews those relevant developments, tries to address several doubts and to connect better theology with that research, after assuming a more pragmatic and empirical stance.

In: Journal of Empirical Theology
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Abstract

John Shook’s paper Are People Born to be Believers? raises many questions, for the scientific study of religion and for philosophy and theology. For reasons of convenience this response distinguishes in the target article between three quite different issues and deals with them separately: first issue concerns the supposed innateness of religious beliefs, or some precursor of them; second, the possible theological application that such thesis could entail; and third, a more general and methodological issue, concerns the feasibility of a scientific knowledge about religion that can be disentangled from other sources of religious insight

In: Method & Theory in the Study of Religion