In: International Journal of Comparative Sociology
Editors: Wil Arts and Loek Halman
This volume deals with Europe’s diversity and homogeneity at the turn of the millennium in terms of fundamental value orientations. Using data from the 1999/2000 wave of the European Values Study the contributors to this book try to identify and offer explanations and understandings of the patterns in the basic values and attitudes that have been ascertained in specific life-spheres, e.g., work and leisure time, religion, morality, society and politics, family and marriage. The result is a cultural map of Europe that captures the diversities and similarities in value profiles of the Europeans.
In: Changing Values, Persisting Cultures
Editors: Wil Arts and Loek Halman
The comparative method is at the core of sociological inquiry and gained new importance, emphasis and practitioners particularly after the second world war as a consequence of a large variety of international and global scale developments.
The contributions to this book regard nations or countries as contextual units of analysis and treat them as variables. Theoretical explanations are presented of how social phenomena are systematically related to characteristics of the nation states and these explanations are tested empirically using the qualitative tools of mainstream sociology.
The chapters in this book can be useful to a broad audience and a range of social scientists who are interested in the understanding of contemporary social phenomena that are no longer limited to national borders but that are transnational or of a global order.

Contributors are Toril Aalberg, Wil Arts, Carole B. Burgoyne, Loek Halman, Piet Hermkens, Guillermina Jasso, Mebs Kanji, James R. Kluegel, Ola Listhaug, David S. Mason, Petr Matěju, Neil Nevitte, Thorleif Pettersson, David A. Routh, Svetlana Sidorenko-Stephenson, Johan Verweij, Bernd Wegener, and Peter Van Wijck.
The Europeans’ Religion at the End of the 20th Century
Editors: Loek Halman and Ole Riis
The cross-national analyses of Europe’s patterns of religious and moral orientations presented in this book are all based on the 1990 European Values Study survey data and some use both 1981 and 1990 data. Use is also made of more recent data gathered in 1995/1997 within the framework of the World Values Study, directed by Ron Inglehart, as well as data from a recent pilot survey in Japan. The contributions in this book are not written within a common theoretical framework, but from different theoretical perspectives and scientific backgrounds and interests. However, a majority of the chapters focus on the Catholic and Protestant divide in Europe. All in all, the contributions in this book show (parts) of the religious and moral culture in contemporary secularizing societies.
The European's religion at the end of the 20th century
Editors: Loek Halman and Ole Riis
The European Values Study is a large-scale, cross-national, and longitudinal survey research program on basic human values, initiated by the European Value Systems Study Group (EVSSG) in the late 1970s, at that time an informal grouping of academics. Now, it is carried on in the setting of a foundation, using the (abbreviated) name of the group European Values Study (EVS).
The EVSSG aimed at designing and conducting a major empirical study of the moral and social values underlying European social and political institutions and governing conduct.

A rich academic literature has now been created around the original survey, and numerous other works have made use of the findings.
Editors: Loek Halman and Neil Nevitte
The European Values Study is a large-scale, cross-national, and longitudinal survey research program on basic human values, initiated by the European Value Systems Study Group (EVSSG) in the late 1970s, at that time an informal grouping of academics. Now, it is carried on in the setting of a foundation, using the (abbreviated) name of the group European Values Study (EVS).
The EVSSG aimed at designing and conducting a major empirical study of the moral and social values underlying European social and political institutions and governing conduct.

A rich academic literature has now been created around the original survey, and numerous other works have made use of the findings.
Volume Editors: Wil Arts and Loek Halman
People's fundamental values can be conceived of as conceptions of what is desirable. They influence their selection from available modes, means and ends of action. Because of the societal importance of values they deserve scholarly attention. This volume inquires into the values present-day Europeans cherish by empirically analyzing the data of 2008/2010 wave of the European Values Study and explaining the consensus and contrasts in value orientations found. The contributors to this volume try to capture the diversities and similarities in value orientations between contemporary European countries in a range of life-spheres by unravelling context and composition effects. They are in search of evidence that either country level factors such as institutional arrangements or the composition of the populations of countries in terms of gender, age, socio-economic status, religion etcetera have the greatest impact. By doing so they paint the moral landscapes of Europe today.
Volume Editors: Loek Halman and Malina Voicu
Since the dramatic events in 1989 and 1990, Central and Eastern Europeans have been engaged in a process of democratization and liberalization which are transforming their societies fundamentally. The rapid transformation processes appear to be very differential and the particular patterns are complex to interpret and understand. This volume elaborates on a number of issues that seem particular important for the people in Central and Eastern Europe: the development and working of democracy, the public support for, legitimacy and efficacy of democracy and the free market economy, and of course the stability of the newly established political culture.