Abstract

Administration of the cell impermeant fluorescent K+ and Na+ probes potassium-binding fluorescent indicator (PBFI) and sodium-binding fluorescent indicator (SBFI) to the lumina of ampullary electroreceptor organs in the transparent catfish Kryptopterus bicirrhis (Valenciennes 1840), demonstrated an unexpected high concentration of K+ ions: 50 mM. Since the lumina of the ampullary organs are in open contact with the surrounding water, such a high K+ concentration inside the lumen can be maintained only by heavy metabolic transport. The implications of this finding for stimulus transduction in freshwater ampullary electroreceptor cells are discussed.

In: Animal Biology

Abstract

Spontaneous firing of neurons plays an essential part in the detection of sensory stimuli. Spontaneous firing of primary afferents of ampullary electroreceptor organs in the catfish Ameiurus nebulosus (Lesueur, 1819) was studied in relation to the distribution, thresholds, and frequency characteristics of the electroreceptor organs. The spontaneous firing rate was correlated with the place on the skin. The mean inter-spike interval in 55 dorsal and 49 ventral ampullary organs in five specimens was 16.8 ms +/- 0.41 SEM and 20.5 ms +/- 0.48 SEM, corresponding to firing rates of 59.5 and 48.7 s-1 respectively. The concomitant coefficients of variation were 0.33 and 0.29. Approximately half of the dorsal ampullae were innervated by two fibres. The firing rates of each of the two fibres was lower than the firing rate of organs innervated by a single neuron. Responses to stimuli as weak as 10 pA could be recovered from the noisy average firing level provided the number of averaging sweeps was sufficiently large. This was equivalent to a stimulus of 0.025 μV/cm and was lower than the behavioural threshold of 1 μV/cm. The gain of the frequency response was enhanced at the carrier frequency, at twice the carrier frequency, and in the range from 75-90 Hz. The results revealed that the occurrence of spontaneous activity improved the signal to noise ratio of responses to electrical stimuli by reduction of the coefficient of variation, absence of a threshold, and phase locking.

In: Animal Biology

Abstract

A large range of aquatic vertebrates employs passive electroreception to detect the weak bioelectric fields that surround their prey. Bioelectric fields are dynamic in strength and frequency composition, but typically consist of a direct current (DC) and an alternating current (AC) component. We examined the biological relevance of these components for prey detection behaviour in the brown bullhead by means of a preference test. We gave each fish the choice between two small dipoles emitting a DC step or AC stimulus of variable strength, respectively. We used AC stimuli that were either representative for ventilatory movements by prey (1 Hz sine wave) or optimal for the ampullary electroreceptor cells (10 Hz sine wave). In an attempt to present a more complex stimulus, we also used slightly modified recordings of bioelectric prey fields, but this yielded no results. Brown bullheads prefer DC stimuli to 10 Hz sine waves if the stimulus intensity of either component is much larger. When the stimulus presentation consists of DC versus 1 Hz, most fish will choose randomly unless the stimulus intensities differ greatly. Then, they favour the component that had a higher amplitude during training. Our results suggest an intrinsic behavioural preference for very low frequency signals (<10 Hz) as well as plasticity in prey detection behaviour.

In: Animal Biology

Abstract

Heart rate deceleration (HRD) after exposure to novel stimuli is part of the orienting reflex, and can be used as a tool to investigate the susceptibility of various organisms to sensory stimuli. HRD as response criterion was used in unrestrained catfish, Ameiurus (Ictalurus) nebulosus (Lesueur, 1819) to investigate its susceptibility to electrical stimuli. HRD in catfish occurs after stimulation with light, mechanical stimuli, and electrical stimuli. HRD shows habituation and correlates with stimulus strength. The response to sinusoidal electrical stimuli from 70 to 700 μV/cm p-p was determined in the range from 0.1 to 1000 Hz. Using HRD as response criterion we found that at 85 μV/cm catfish react to stimuli from 0.1 to 3 Hz. In the absence of stimuli, the heart rate develops an ultradian rhythm with periods of 7 to 15 min. About twice a day cardiac arrest of 1 min occurs. During anaesthesia oscillations with a period of about 1 min are recorded. Comparison of this study with others supports the notion that there exist at least two neural channels for processing electrical stimuli. One channel is involved in predation, namely processing the fast potential changes accompanying the passage of a bioelectric dipole; another is involved in processing uniform DC fields used for navigation.

In: Animal Biology