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This essay provides an introduction to the relation of habitus as a concept to Catholic ethical thinking and the philosophy of Thomas Aquinas in particular, and it argues in the first half that habitus plays a central role in Thomas's thought and Catholic ethics in general. The second half of the article then addresses three contemporary challenges: the challenge that our sense of teleology is a mistaken biological byproduct, the challenge denying conceptions of natural kinds, and the challenge of the is-ought distinction. Catholic virtue ethics is able to meet these challenges, and it provides a superior account compared to naturalistic alternatives.

In: Portrayals of Antigone in Portugal 
In: Portrayals of Antigone in Portugal 
In: Translation Practices
In: The Reception of Aeschylus’ Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers
In: Portrayals of Antigone in Portugal 
In: Portrayals of Antigone in Portugal 
In: Portrayals of Antigone in Portugal 

This essay introduces the subject of habit and its significance for contemporary philosophy, science, and theology. The contributions of the text cover both the topic of “mere habit” and the richer conception of habitus as found in Aristotle and Aquinas. These ancient and medieval accounts of habit and habitus can provide a rich resource for contemporary approaches in virtue ethics and moral psychology, possibly providing insight as to how we should think of current dual-processing models.

In: Portrayals of Antigone in Portugal 
20th and 21st Century Rewritings of the Antigone Myth 
Portrayals of Antigone in Portugal gathers a collection of essays on the Portuguese drama rewritings of this Theban myth produced in the 20th and 21st centuries. For each of the cases analysed, the Portuguese historical, political and cultural context is described. This perspective is expanded through a dialogue with coeval European events. As concerns Portugal, this results principally in political and feminist approaches to the texts.
Since the importation of the Sophoclean model is often indirect, the volume includes comparisons with intermediate sources, namely French (Cocteau, Anouilh) and Spanish (María Zambrano), which were extremely influential on the many and diversified versions written in Portugal during this period.