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Volume 4 (2019), Published under the auspices of Queen Mary University of London and EFILA
With the entrance of the European Union into the field of International Investment Law and Arbitration, a new specialist field of law, namely ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’ is in the making. This new field of law draws on EU Law, Public International Law, International Investment Law, International Arbitration Law and Practice and International Economic Law, while other fields of law such as Energy Law are also relevant.
This Review is the first law yearbook that is specifically dedicated to the field of ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’.

Published under the auspices of Queen Mary University of London and EFILA.

The European Investment Law and Arbitration Review is also available online.
Volume 3 (2018), Published under the auspices of Queen Mary University of London and EFILA
Free access to the 3rd Annual EFILA Lecture by Christopher Greenwood (until 1 June 2020).

With the entrance of the European Union into the field of International Investment Law and Arbitration, a new specialist field of law, namely ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’ is in the making. This new field of law draws on EU Law, Public International Law, International Investment Law, International Arbitration Law and Practice and International Economic Law, while other fields of law such as Energy Law are also relevant.
This Review is the first law yearbook that is specifically dedicated to the field of ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’.

Published under the auspices of Queen Mary University of London and EFILA.

The European Investment Law and Arbitration Review is also available online.
In: European Investment Law and Arbitration Review Online
In: European Investment Law and Arbitration Review Online

Abstract

Speed is often touted as an advantage of arbitration. In recent years, however, some have worried that investment arbitration risks losing this advantage. Concerns about the length of investor-State dispute settlement (ISDS) proceedings have also been raised in the discussion about ISDS reform. This article analyses the duration of ISDS proceedings applying a data-centric approach and evaluates the impact of proposed ISDS reforms on the duration of proceedings. After some terminological clarifications on when proceedings are ‘excessively’ long, the article sets out the evidence on the length of proceedings using several data-sets. As a comparator, we present data on the length of World Trade Organization (WTO) proceedings, even though we urge caution as to the usefulness of such a comparator. The article then discusses the impact of various reform proposals on the duration of proceedings, namely improving ISDS, adding an appellate mechanism, establishing a multilateral investment court and abolishing ISDS.

In: The Journal of World Investment & Trade