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Theoretical, Methodological and Empirical Explorations
Volume Editor: Lucy Avraamidou
The overarching goal of this book volume is to illuminate how research on science teacher identity has deepened and complicated our understanding of the role of identity in examining teacher learning and development.
The collective chapters, both theoretical and empirical, present an array of conceptual underpinnings that have been used to frame science teacher identity, document the various methodological approaches that researchers have implemented in order to study science teacher identity within various contexts, and offer empirical evidence about science teacher identity development.
The findings of the studies presented in this volume support the argument that teacher identity is a dynamic, multidimensional and comprehensive construct, which provides a powerful lens for studying science teacher learning and development for various reasons.
First, it pushes our boundaries by extending our definitions of science teacher learning and development as it proposes new ways of conceptualizing the processes of becoming a science teacher.
Second, it emphasizes the role of the context on science teacher learning and development and pays attention to the experiences that teachers have as members of various communities.
Third, it allows us to examine the impact of various sub-identities, personal histories, emotions, and social markers, such as ethnicity, race, and class, on science teachers’ identity development.
The book aims at making a unique and deeply critical contribution to notions around science teacher identity by proposing fresh theoretical perspectives, providing empirical evidence about identity development, offering a set of implications for science teacher preparation, and recommending directions for future research.
In: Studying Science Teacher Identity
In: Studying Science Teacher Identity
In: Studying Science Teacher Identity
Volume Editors: Phyllis Katz and Lucy Avraamidou
In this book the editors consider the resistance to change among teachers and learners despite all the evidence that science participation brings benefits for both individuals and nations. Beginning with biology, Stability and Change in Science Education: Meeting Basic Learning Needs explores this balance in teaching and learning science. The authors reflect upon this equilibrium as they each present their work and its contribution.

The book provides a wide range of examples using the change/stability lens. Authors from the Netherlands, Israel, Spain, Canada and the USA discuss how they observe and consider both homeostasis and novelty in theory, projects and other work. The book contains examples from science educators in schools and in other science rich settings.

Contributors are: Lucy Avraamidou, Ayelet Baram-Tsabari, Michelle Crowl, Marilynne Eichinger, Lars Guenther, Maria Heras, Phyllis Katz, Joy Kubarek, Lucy R. McClain, Patricia Patrick, Wolff-Michael Roth, Isabel Ruiz-Mallen, Lara Smetana, Hani Swirski, Heather Toomey Zimmerman, and Bart Van de Laar.
Abstract This introduction provides the rationale for the book. We put forward an argument about the importance of science education and the extensive reform movement whose goals are to make it more relevant to students and the public. We explain how we considered the basic needs of homeostasis and novelty, as we thought about the nature of the changes we seek to implement as science educators. We include a description of the questions the contributing authors sought to answer in approaching the challenge to look at their work in terms of these basic needs.
In: Stability and Change in Science Education -- Meeting Basic Learning Needs
Abstract Why a book from this viewpoint? Homeostasis and novelty are two basic needs that explain many activities of human life. Derived from biology, the first term describes the tendency to maintain a steady state; the second term is one for which there is evidence that evolution has favored the recognition of the different or new, to assist humans in considering the not-yet-known in an ever changing world in which we must take decisive actions to survive. We recognize regular patterns and the apparent exceptions to those patterns – an essential part of science learning and research. Not only do our individual bodies and minds have these tendencies, but the institutions we have created exhibit them as well. We create venerable institutions that do things in certain ways, just as we recognize in our identities that we may be (and see in others) certain “kinds” of people. Gaining insights into how we and the public respond to efforts in science education through a lens focused on these basic needs may help us better understand how some of our projects engage participants in ways that take hold and others do not.
In: Stability and Change in Science Education -- Meeting Basic Learning Needs
In: Stability and Change in Science Education -- Meeting Basic Learning Needs
In: Stability and Change in Science Education -- Meeting Basic Learning Needs
In: Stability and Change in Science Education -- Meeting Basic Learning Needs