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In: Handbook of East Asian New Religious Movements
In: Handbook of East Asian New Religious Movements
In: Korea 2013
In: Korea 2013
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Abstract

The myth of the millennium (i.e., the belief in an imminent salvational change of the current world order), brought forth either progressively or catastrophically, is grounding the soteriological self-identity of East Asian new religious movements (NRMs). This paper will systematically explore the strikingly similar ethnocentric (i.e., Japanocentric, Koreacentric, Sinocentric, Vietnam-centric) colouring of the myth across a wide range of East Asian NRMs. It will be shown which function the ethnocentric topos carries for the millenarian narrative articulated by these religions.

In: Explaining, Interpreting, and Theorizing Religion and Myth
Author:

Abstract

A self-styled successor of Helena P. Blavatsky, Helena Roerich, and Alice A. Bailey, Benjamin Creme (1922–2016), the founder and figurehead of Share International, has been crucial in promoting ufological-cum-millenarian ideas within the New Age current. He is best known for his popularising of Maitreya, the World Teacher. Featuring prominently in his messianic programme are the phenomena of crop circles and UFO sightings. This chapter explores in detail Creme’s UFO thought, which still resonates widely within the alternative religious community.

In: Handbook of UFO Religions
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Abstract

Based on original sources, this chapter introduces major East Asian UFO religions, delineating their chief ufological narratives. The movements discussed include Chino Shōhō with its Pana-Wave Laboratory, GLA, Kōfuku no Kagaku (Happy Science), and Kurama Kōkyō (Japan), Fǎlún Gōng (Fǎlún Dàfǎ) and Zhēndào Jiàohuì (Chen Tao) (China/Taiwan), as well as Chŭngsando and Yŏngsaenggyo Hananim’ŭi Sŏnghoe (Sŭngni Chedan) (South Korea). Notable in all cases is the influence of the New Age current.

In: Handbook of UFO Religions
Author:

Abstract

Drawing on archival research and interview data, this paper discusses the historical development as well as the present configuration of the Japanese Buddhist panorama in Austria, which includes Zen, Pure Land, and Nichiren Buddhism. It traces the early beginnings, highlights the key stages and activities in the expansion process, and sheds light on both denominational complexity and international entanglement. Fifteen years before any other European country (Portugal in 1998; Italy in 2000), Austria formally acknowledged Buddhism as a legally recognised religious society in 1983. Hence, the paper also explores the larger organisational context of the Österreichische Buddhistische Religionsgesellschaft (Austrian Buddhist Religious Society) with a focus on its Japanese Buddhist actors. Additionally, it briefly outlines the non-Buddhist Japanese religious landscape in Austria.

Open Access
In: Journal of Religion in Japan