Editor: Luke Lavan
Late Antique Archaeology contains papers which each year systematically address a chosen theme relating to the historical reconstruction of Mediterranean society, from the accession of Diocletian (AD 283) to approximately the middle of the 7th century.

*For Brill's peer review process see here.

Please note that volumes 9 to 12 were issued as journal publications, Late Antique Archaeology Journal. In addition, these four volumes were also published as separate books (volume 11 and 12 as one book):
- Field Methods and Post-Excavation Techniques in Late Antique Archaeology.
- Local Economies? Production and Exchange of Inland Regions in Late Antiquity.
- Environment and Society in the Long Late Antiquity.

From volume 13 onwards, the publications will be reinstituted as a book series, Late Antique Archaeology.

For monographs, please see Late Antique Archaeology: Supplementary Series.
Editor: Luke Lavan
Contributions generally aim to present broad syntheses on topics relating to a specific theme, discussions of key issues, or try to provide summaries of relevant new fieldwork. The volumes address themes relating to the historical reconstruction of Mediterranean society, from the accession of Diocletian (AD 283) to approximately the middle of the 7th century.
PART 1: Streets, Processions, Fora, Agorai, Macella, Shops. PART 2: Sites, Buildings, Dates
Author: Luke Lavan
This book investigates the nature of 'public space' in Mediterranean cities, A.D. 284-650, meaning places where it was impossible to avoid meeting people from all parts of society, whether different religious confessions or social groups. The first volume considers the architectural form and everyday functions of streets, fora / agorai, market buildings, and shops, including a study of processions and everyday street life. The second volume analyses archaeological evidence for the construction, repair, use, and abandonment of these urban spaces, based on standardised principles of phasing and dating. The conclusions provide insights into the urban environment of Constantinople, an assessment of urban institutions and citizenship, and a consideration of the impact of Christianity on civic life at this time.
Production and Exchange of Inland Regions in Late Antiquity
Editor: Luke Lavan
The Roman economy was operated significantly above subsistence level, with production being stimulated by both taxation and trade. Some regions became wealthy on the basis of exporting low-value agricultural products across the Mediterranean. In contrast, it has usually been assumed that the high costs of land transport kept inland regions relatively poor. This volume challenges these assumptions by presenting new research on production and exchange within inland regions. The papers, supported by detailed bibliographic essays, range from Britain to Jordan. They reveal robust agricultural economies in many interior regions. Here, some wealth did come from high value products, which could defy transport costs. However, ceramics also indicate local exchange systems, capable of generating wealth without being integrated into inter-regional trading networks. The role of the State in generating production and exchange is visible, but often co-existed with local market systems.
Contributors are Alyssa A. Bandow, Fanny Bessard, Michel Bonifay, Kim Bowes, Stefano Costa, Jeremy Evans, Elizabeth Fentress, Piroska Hárshegyi, Adam Izdebski, Luke Lavan, Tamara Lewit, Phil Mills, Katalin Ottományi, Peter Sarris, Emanuele Vaccaro, Agnès Vokaer, Mark Whittow and Andrea Zerbini.
In: Late Antique Archaeology
Author: Luke Lavan

This article explores the fate of certain statues of pagan gods and heroes that were displayed not in temples but in streets, squares and public buildings. These images had a functional connection to the civic activities that took place there, especially political activities. An attempt is made to detect to what extent such functional connections were retained or disrupted in Late Antiquity. The fate of images of Victory, Tyche, Minerva, civic heroes and emperors, both living and dead, is examined and compared. Christian attempts to reform their uses can be detected, but these seem to have had limited impact until the mid-6th c. Tentative conclusions are drawn about the significance of the selective preservation of some statues, which may have survived as political talismans in uncertain times.

In: Late Antique Archaeology
Author: Luke Lavan

Abstract

This article investigates the history of the agorai and minor plazas, excavated at Sagalassos in SW Turkey, during late antiquity (A.D. 283 to ca. 650). It presents new field observations made by the author, based on a survey of stone surface markings, epigraphic context, and spoliation history, and offers an interpretive study of these spaces in terms of their function during the 4th–7th centuries A.D. An assessment of the significance of these observations for the nature of urban government in this period is also offered.

In: Late Antique Archaeology
Author: Luke Lavan

Abstract

Our understanding of late antique archaeology has now reached a point where it is possible to suggest specific field methods better adapted to the material evidence and historical problems of the period, at least for urban archaeology. We need to be more sensitive to patterns of evidential survival that are particular to this era, and especially to engage with the evidential traces provided by patterns of reuse, and by the slight relaxation of civic rules seen in the period. If we focus on stone surface archaeology, study spolia contexts, behavioural epigraphy, small-scale repairs and decorative traces, then we can obtain a great deal of information from poorly excavated sites which were previously considered archaeologically barren. This may, perhaps, reveal the futility of clearance archaeology, which is still being practised on some eastern sites.

In: Late Antique Archaeology