Economic and Social Aspects of Periodic Trade in a Pre-Industrial Society
Author: Luuk de Ligt
Periodic markets are institutions of crucial importance in all pre-industrial economies. Yet the subject has been given little atten-tion by Roman historians. The aim of this book is to remedy this state of affairs through an empire-wide study of annual, bi-annual, monthly and ‘weekly’ markets. The method used involves the interpretation of the ancient evidence in terms of economic and anthropo-logical theory and against the background of comparative data. Dr de Ligt starts by demonstrat-ing the continued importance of local and regional fairs throughout the im-perial period. Special attention is devoted to the role of both annual fairs and high-frequency periodic markets in the rural economy. In the second half of the book the scope of the discussion is extended to social and political aspects. Finally, the book addresses such topics as urban resistance towards neighbouring rural markets and the widespread practice of waiving customs duties for the duration of largescale religious festivals.
Editor: Luuk de Ligt
With contributions by J.A. Ankum, O. Behrends, G.C.J.J. v.d. Bergh, A.M.J.A Berkvens, Th.E. v. Bochove, F.J. Bruinsma, R. Feenstra, R. Forrez A.Fl. Gehlen, F.W. Grosheide, J. Hellebeek, M.L. Hewett, J.B.M. van Hoek, A.M. Hol, E. Hondius, C.J.H. Jansen, R. Knütel, C. de Koninck, C. Krampe, B. Kupisch, L. de Ligt, J.H.A. Lokin, J. Menner, O. Moorman van Kappen, P.L. Nève, C.H. van Rhee, E.J.H. Schrage, A.J.B. Sirks, E. Slob, B.H. Stolte, R. Verstegen, M. v.d. Vrugt, A. Wacke, L. Waelkens, T. Wallinga, A. Watson, L.C. Winkel, F.B.J. Wubbe, W.J. Zwalve
In: The Transformation of Economic Life under the Roman Empire
In: Roman Rule and Civic Life: Local and Regional Perspectives
In: Crises and the Roman Empire
Recent research has called into question the orthodox view that the last two centuries of the Roman Republic witnessed a decline of the free rural population. Yet the implications of the alternative reconstructions of Italy's demographic history that have been proposed have never been explored systematically. This volume offers a series of in-depth discussions not only of the republican manpower and census figures but also of the abundant archaeological data. It also explores the growth of cities, especially Rome, and the changing distribution of the population over the Italian landscape. On the rural side it addresses the interplay between demographic, economic, and legal developments and the background to the Gracchan land reforms. Finally it examines the political implications of demographic growth and large-scale migration to the provinces. The volume as a whole demonstrates that demography is the key to many aspects of Italy's economic, social, military, and political history.
Volume Editors: Luuk de Ligt and John Bintliff
The focus of Regional Urban Systems in the Roman World is on urban hierarchies and interactions in large geographical areas rather than on individual cities. Based on a painstaking examination of archaeological and epigraphic evidence relating to more than 1,000 cities, the volume offers comprehensive reconstructions of the urban systems of Roman Gaul, North Africa, Sicily, Greece and Asia Minor. In addition it examines the transformation of the settlement systems of the Iberian Peninsula and the central and northern Balkan following the imposition of Roman rule. Throughout the volume regional urban configurations are examined from a rich variety of perspectives, ranging from climate and landscape, administration and politics, economic interactions and social relationships all the way to region-specific ways of shaping the townscapes of individual cities.