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  • Author or Editor: Ma. Lourdes Veneracion-Rallonza x
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Abstract

Women, Peace and Security (wps) as a global agenda has gained traction since it was institutionalized in the United Nations Security Council (UNSCR) fifteen years ago. By December 2014, 46 out of 193 Member States of the United Nations have adopted their National Action Plans to systematically implement their respective country commitments to wps. To date, 24 of the countries with National Action Plans (NAP) are in Europe while 13 are in Africa; the Asia Pacific Region has 6 and the Americas have 3. In Southeast Asia, only the Philippines has developed a NAP within the framework of the wps while other countries integrated it in the existing broad policy and programmatic frames such as addressing violence against women. At the level of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (asean), taking on the agenda of WPS has yet to move beyond communicative rhetoric. This paper is an attempt to explore how wps can be made part of the regional agenda on human protection and mass atrocities prevention, by mapping out discursive and institutional entry points within several asean Member States and within asean itself through the idea of multi-focal norm entrepreneurship.

In: Regionalism and Human Protection

This paper explores political participation in the post-modern sense where it is understood in terms of performativity. Such articulation brings to light a broader view of performance politics beyond the normal or traditional realms of governments and institutions and congruently advances into the fore the multiplicity and complexity of other actors and activities of political action. In this sense, the performance of political participation as resistance serves as the embodiment of active and creative disruption, the epitome of performing politics. To illustrate this dynamic, this article centers on women’s political participation through naked protests and examines how performativity is implicated in Femen and Meira Paibi’s body protests against rape. Discursively, it applies analytical discussions from Goffman (performativity as social interaction) and Butler (gender performativity) to illustrate that women’s naked protests are innovative expressions of women’s political participation that must be understood more substantively, particularly, within the analytical dynamic of feminist theorization.

In: Philippine Political Science Journal

This article reconstructs the stories of three women who experienced armed conflict in the Philippines. Their narratives were documented through the process of individual storytelling, an exercise that involved reflexive meaning creation on the part of the storyteller. Thus, even as there have been numerous studies reflecting the discourses of women’s victimization/vulnerability and agency in the context of armed conflict, this article stands by the importance of each and every story told by each and every woman. In other words, beyond the project of narrative documentation and analysis lies that marginal space where stories told are not just valuable for the hard data they contain; their significance must also be seen from the vantage points of storytellers as cocreators of knowledge that can provide alternative perspectives on the linearity of the discourses of women’s victimization/vulnerability and agency.

In: Philippine Political Science Journal

Women, Peace and Security (wps) as a global agenda has gained traction since it was institutionalized in the United Nations Security Council fifteen years ago. By December 2014, 46 out of 193 Member States of the United Nations have adopted their National Action Plans to systematically implement their respective country commitments to wps. To date, 24 of the countries with National Action Plans are in Europe while 13 are in Africa; the Asia Pacific Region has 6 and the Americas have 3. In Southeast Asia, only the Philippines has developed a National Action Plan within the framework of the wps while other countries integrated it in the existing broad policy and programmatic frames such as addressing violence against women. At the level of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (asean), taking on the agenda of women, peace and security has yet to move beyond communicative rhetoric. This paper is an attempt to explore how wps can be made part of the regional agenda on human protection and mass atrocities prevention, by mapping out discursive and institutional entry points within several asean Member States and within asean itself through the idea of multi-focal norm entrepreneurship.

In: Global Responsibility to Protect