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Author: Maciej Górny

Abstract

The article compares Marxist histories of historiography in Poland, Czechoslovakia, and East Germany of the so called Stalinist period. In the postwar years, historiography contributed to the legitimization of Communist regimes, widely using nationalist narratives. In the 1950s and early 1960s this tendency was partly marginalized and accompanied by a critical reinterpretation of the previous historiographical traditions. Describing the latter process, the author points at the divergent geopolitical situation, the different patterns of the adoption of Marxist methodology, and the various strategies of defending the national tradition characterizing these three countries. While East Central European Marxists sometimes questioned the national historiographical traditions, quite often they simply inserted them into the Marxist vision of the past.

In: East Central Europe
Author: Maciej Górny

In the long 19th century the social sciences were rapidly developing. One of their popular research fields was national character. It was believed to manifest itself in high and rural culture, art and architecture, literature and history, forms of religiosity and philosophy, and – last but not least – in psychology. The present paper analyses scientific discourses referring to national, cultural and racial character of the “others” - identified mostly with the war enemy - in the years from 1914 to the mid-1920s. Its geographical range covers Eastern and Central Europe as well as (to a lesser extent) France, Great Britain and the USA. The author refers to the methods of historische Stereotypenforschung along with the discourse analysis and comparative history of science to describe not only the intellectual tools and motifs of the genre but also the interdependences between various sciences within and beyond every one of the countries under scrutiny.

In: Baltic Eugenics
In: Other Fronts, Other Wars?
Author: Maciej Górny

In the long 19th century the social sciences were rapidly developing. One of their popular research fields was national character. It was believed to manifest itself in high and rural culture, art and architecture, literature and history, forms of religiosity and philosophy, and – last but not least – in psychology. The present paper analyses scientific discourses referring to national, cultural and racial character of the “others” - identified mostly with the war enemy - in the years from 1914 to the mid-1920s. Its geographical range covers Eastern and Central Europe as well as (to a lesser extent) France, Great Britain and the USA. The author refers to the methods of historische Stereotypenforschung along with the discourse analysis and comparative history of science to describe not only the intellectual tools and motifs of the genre but also the interdependences between various sciences within and beyond every one of the countries under scrutiny.

In: Baltic Eugenics
In: War and the Humanities
In: Science embattled
In: Science embattled
In: Science embattled
In: Science embattled