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Camus’s treatment of the great German Idealist, W.G.F. Hegel in L’Homme révolté has received much attention and criticism. As in the cases of Rousseau or Kierkegaard, Camus is lambasted by critics as a thinker who failed to fully understand Hegelian thought, instead dismissing it on basis of a superficial reading. What emerges in Maciej Kaluza’s chapter () is a much more complex picture of the relations between The Phenomenology of Spirit and The Rebel than many commentators have supposed. Kałuża’s analysis reaches out not only to Hegel himself, but also to his famous commentators in French thought, showing their indirect influence on Camusian conclusions. Much of what Camus criticized in Hegel, Kałuża shows, should be more accurately directed against Alexander Kojève and his famous, highly influential interpretation of Hegel’s master-slave dialectic from the Phenomenology of Spirit. Additionally, given our knowledge of Camus’s studies of Jean Hyppolite’s commentaries – especially focused on the issue of unhappy consciousness – Kaluza argues that Camus’s view of Hegelianism could have been much more balanced and dialogical than it remained.

In: Brill's Companion to Camus
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Camus’s treatment of the great German Idealist, W.G.F. Hegel in L’Homme révolté has received much attention and criticism. As in the cases of Rousseau or Kierkegaard, Camus is lambasted by critics as a thinker who failed to fully understand Hegelian thought, instead dismissing it on basis of a superficial reading. What emerges in Maciej Kaluza’s chapter () is a much more complex picture of the relations between The Phenomenology of Spirit and The Rebel than many commentators have supposed. Kałuża’s analysis reaches out not only to Hegel himself, but also to his famous commentators in French thought, showing their indirect influence on Camusian conclusions. Much of what Camus criticized in Hegel, Kałuża shows, should be more accurately directed against Alexander Kojève and his famous, highly influential interpretation of Hegel’s master-slave dialectic from the Phenomenology of Spirit. Additionally, given our knowledge of Camus’s studies of Jean Hyppolite’s commentaries – especially focused on the issue of unhappy consciousness – Kaluza argues that Camus’s view of Hegelianism could have been much more balanced and dialogical than it remained.

In: Brill's Companion to Camus
In: Coming Back to the Absurd: Albert Camus’s The Myth of Sisyphus: 80 Years On
This collection of essays from some of the world's leading Camus scholars is a celebration of the enduring significance and impact of Albert Camus's first philosophical essay The Myth of Sisyphus. Coming Back to the Absurd examines Camus's unique contribution to philosophy through The Myth since its publication. The essays within are intended to engage students and scholars of existentialism, phenomenology and the history of philosophy, as well as those simply seeking greater understanding of one of the most influential philosophers and philosophical constructs of the twentieth century. In revisiting The Myth, the authors hope to inspire a new generation of Camus scholars.
Volume Editors: , , and
This book is the first English-language collection of essays by leading Camus scholars from around the world to focus on Albert Camus’ place and status as a philosopher amongst philosophers. After a thematic introduction, the dedicated chapters of Part 1 address Camus’ relations with leading philosophers, from the ancient Greeks to Jean-Paul Sartre (Augustine, Hume, Kant, Diderot, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Husserl, Hegel, Marx, Sartre). Part 2 contains pieces considering philosophical themes in Camus’ works, from the absurd in The Myth of Sisyphus to love in The First Man (the absurd, psychoanalysis, justice, Algeria, solidarity and solitude, revolution and revolt, art, asceticism, love).
In: Brill's Companion to Camus
In: Brill's Companion to Camus
In: Brill's Companion to Camus
In: Brill's Companion to Camus
In: Brill's Companion to Camus