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In: EU Management of Global Emergencies

Abstract

The perspective of time and space in advertising stories is meant to uncover the brand image and product features, according to appropriate narrative techniques. Every commercial sequence happens in a specific space and time, following both the brand evolution and the strategy. Given that an advertising story shapes the message based on the characters involvement and the proper scenarios, this study aims to reveal categories of time and space as they are outlined by the research.

The study was carried out through discourse analysis applied to a sample made up by advertisements running from 2005 to 2008 in Romania, equally shared between global and local well-known brands. Therefore, this chapter aims to reveal significant narrative strategies related to campaign objectives and branding equation. The main hypothesis of the present study states that a relevant advertising story should focus on consumption time and space representations for each brand and product in order to achieve a high level of consumers’ loyalty.

Overall, the entire study strives for discovering on the one hand the association between space and time references in advertising stories, and on the other the relationship between product categories and narrative techniques.

In: Storytelling: Global Reflections on Narrative

Various academic fields today focus on narrative techniques. This happens because telling a good story is the most effective strategy in establishing productive relationships with people, regardless of one’s communication goals. In advertising, narration is used to convey brand or product message, position them in the minds of consumers, and, ultimately, achieve satisfactory levels of retention. That is why we strongly believe that each product category can develop captivating stories. The interest they create in the audience is mostly influenced by story theme, storyteller, commercial format, specific narrative strategies, and, above all, in the way the consumer is invited to engage with the story. The main hypothesis of this chapter is that advertising stories reactivate old archetypes and myths. This is based on the fact that the most important, common story topics have remained the same throughout known history, such topics as love, death, happiness, and sadness. Additionally, advertisements expand the classic borders of storytelling by creating short scripts which are developed in creative formats, such as biography, brand history, producer’s history, the story of the product’s birth, journal, testimonial, and many others. The present qualitative research was conducted on a sample of 100 TV advertisements belonging to different worldwide markets and product categories; these commercials ran from 2008 to 2013. Our research method was discourse analysis, in order to reveal the most effective narrative strategies in use today, the archetypal core of each story, and the role of consumers in this process. As a whole, the current research seeks to answer the following questions: Which myths and archetypes are most often revived in advertisements? Who creates the archetype? And, finally – what does the power of advertising storytelling rely on in terms of narrative strategies?

In: Not Ever Absent: Storytelling in Arts, Culture and Identity Formation

Various academic fields today focus on narrative techniques. This happens because telling a good story is the most effective strategy in establishing productive relationships with people, regardless of one’s communication goals. In advertising, narration is used to convey brand or product message, position them in the minds of consumers, and, ultimately, achieve satisfactory levels of retention. That is why we strongly believe that each product category can develop captivating stories. The interest they create in the audience is mostly influenced by story theme, storyteller, commercial format, specific narrative strategies, and, above all, in the way the consumer is invited to engage with the story. The main hypothesis of this chapter is that advertising stories reactivate old archetypes and myths. This is based on the fact that the most important, common story topics have remained the same throughout known history, such topics as love, death, happiness, and sadness. Additionally, advertisements expand the classic borders of storytelling by creating short scripts which are developed in creative formats, such as biography, brand history, producer’s history, the story of the product’s birth, journal, testimonial, and many others. The present qualitative research was conducted on a sample of 100 TV advertisements belonging to different worldwide markets and product categories; these commercials ran from 2008 to 2013. Our research method was discourse analysis, in order to reveal the most effective narrative strategies in use today, the archetypal core of each story, and the role of consumers in this process. As a whole, the current research seeks to answer the following questions: Which myths and archetypes are most often revived in advertisements? Who creates the archetype? And, finally – what does the power of advertising storytelling rely on in terms of narrative strategies?

In: Not Ever Absent: Storytelling in Arts, Culture and Identity Formation

Abstract

This article investigates the development of national litigation against the Czech Republic’s governmental policy to detain asylum seekers under the Dublin III Regulation, as a means to address the so-called refugee crisis. The outcome of this litigation has been the preliminary ruling of the Court of Justice of the European Union in the Al Chodor case, which has been praised for enhancing domestic standards of protection of asylum seekers and returnees’ right to liberty across the EU. The article demonstrates that this preliminary ruling has been a catalyst for domestic legislative and jurisprudential reforms across the EU, improving to a certain extent the protection of the right to liberty of asylum seekers. However, it is argued that in the Czech Republic the case has not initiated a change in the legislation, nor has it reduced the systematic use of asylum detention. The article identifies some important legal, political and social factors from within and beyond courtrooms that have contributed to this ambiguous outcome of the Czech litigation. It concludes by identifying circumstances that need to be taken into account when using the preliminary reference procedure as a tool for strategic litigation.

In: European Journal of Migration and Law