No Access

Edited by Kern Alexander and Mads Andenas

The World Trade Organisation plays the primary role in regulating international trade in goods, services and intellectual property. Traditionally, international trade law and regulation has been analysed primarily from the trade-in-goods perspective. Services are becoming an important competence for the WTO. The institutional, legal and regulatory influence of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) on domestic economic policymaking is attracting increasing attention in the academic and policymaking literature.

The growing importance of services trade to the global economy makes the application of the GATS to trade in services an important concern of international economic policy. The GATS contains important innovations that build on the former GATT and existing WTO/GATT trade regime for goods. This book fills a void in the academic and policymaking literature by examining how the GATS governs international trade in services and its growing impact on the regulatory practice of WTO member states. It offers a unique discussion of the major is-sues confronting WTO member states by analysing the GATS and related international trade issues from a variety of perspectives that include law, political economy, regulation, and business.

Moreover, the role of the WTO in promoting liberalised trade and economic development has come under serious strain because of the breakdown of the Doha Development Round negotiations. The book analyses the issues in the Doha services debate with some suggested policy approaches that might help build a more durable GATS framework. The book is a welcomed addition to the WTO literature and will serve as a point of reference for academics, policymakers and practitioners.
No Access

Kern Alexander and Mads Andenas

No Access

Kern Alexander and Mads Andenas

No Access

Kern Alexander and Mads Andenas

No Access

Kern Alexander and Mads Andenas

No Access

Edited by Rein Müllerson, Malgosia Fitzmaurice and Mads Andenas

The recent developments in central and eastern Europe have changed the political landscape of the world. The dissolution of the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia, the collapse of Communism in Europe, market reforms, and the processes of democratisation are all seminal events affecting not only the countries in transition but other states as well. All these changes presuppose fundamental legal reforms. In this process most of the countries in transition have adopted new constitutions where issues of participation in the international political order and questions of international law enjoy a prominent place.
This book is one outcome of many research activities concerning these transitions in central and eastern Europe at the Centre of European Law, King's College London. It contains essays about constitutional reforms and international law by leading international judges and academics.
It is edited by Mads Andenas, Director of the Centre of European Law at King's College London, Malgosia Fitzmaurice, Reader in International Law at Queen Mary and Westfield College, London, and Rein Müllerson, Professor in International Law at King's College.
No Access

Series:

Edited by Mads Andenas, Malgosia Fitzmaurice, Attila Tanzi and Jan Wouters

General Principles and the Coherence of International Lawprovides a collection of intellectually stimulating contributions from leading international lawyers to the discourse on the role of general principles in international law. Offering a comprehensive analysis of the doctrines, practices, and debates on general principles of law, the volume assesses their role in safeguarding the coherence of the international legal system. This important book addresses the relationship between principles of law and the other sources of international law, explores the interplay between principles of law and domestic and regional legal systems and the role of principles of law with regard to three specific regimes of international law: investment law, human rights law and environmental law.