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Abstract

An identification guide is provided for the 35 species of Hedylidae. Wing pattern and genitalia are illustrated for each species. The work is introduced by a summary of the general biology of the group. Foodplants are recorded for 4 species.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

All genus group and species group names of the Hedylidae (Hedyloidea) are catalogued. Thirteen new species group synonymies are made and eight new species group names are recombined. Fourteen lectotypes are designated, and two new species are described.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
The Geometridae is one of the most species-rich families of Lepidoptera. This outstanding book is the first comprehensive catalogue of the 35,000 names of these insects. The primary purpose of the work is to provide a substantial body of taxonomic information, much of it previously unpublished, on the available names of the Geometridae. The catalogue is based on the most complete world classification of the geometrids, the card index to genera and species in The Natural History Museum, London. The two volumes include information on type specimens, type localities and, where possible, larval foodplants. A CD-ROM listing all species referred to in the two text volumes is included with the package and will be of great value to verify names and to check spelling. This catalogue will be the basis for research in Geometridae in all future.
Geometrid Moths of the World: A Catalogue is published by Apollo Books in association with The Natural History Museum, London.

All volumes of the print edition will become available in individual e-books: 9789004542006 (volume 1) - 9789004542020 (volume 2).
In: Geometrid Moths of the World: A Catalogue
The print edition is available as a set of two volumes (9788788757293).
The print edition is available as a set of two volumes (9788788757293).

Abstract

Afrotheora, a new hepialoid genus from central and southern Africa, is described. There are eight species of which seven are named. Three were described previously, but were assigned to other genera (Dalaca rhodaula Meyrick, Eudalaca jordani Viette, and Hepialus thermodes Meyrick - a new senior synonym of Hepialus pardalias Janse). Four new species are named and described (minirhodaula, argentimaculata, flavimaculata and brevivalva). A further new species is described, but is not formally named. All species and their genitalia are described and illustrated. Three new combinations and one new synonymy are established, two lectotypes are designated and Hepialus ptiloscelis Meyrick from South Africa is transferred to Gorgopis Hübner. The monophyly of Afrotheora is recognized by the possession of two unique characters: (1) long bristle-like setae from the antennal scape reaching almost across the compound eye, and (2) the trulleum in the male genitalia comprising two lateral sclerotized rods separated by a membrane. Afrotheora represents one of the 12 hepialoid basal lineages currently thought to be monophyletic, and it is demonstrated that the new taxon is not subordinate to any other of these hepialoid clades. Its relationships are briefly discussed, but its exact affinities await further studies of hepialoid phylogeny. The term 'primitive Hepialidae' is here applied to four genera: Fraus Walker, Gazoryctra Hübner, Antihepialus Janse and Afrotheora. We use 'Hepialidae sensu stricto' to refer to the remaining genera of the Hepialidae sensulato (i.e. the Hepialidae of authors) until the phylogeny of the Hepialoidea is better understood. This does not indicate that the primitive Hepialidae are monophyletic while the Hepialidae sensu stricto undoubtedly are.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

The classification of Parepisparis Bethune-Baker (Geometridae: Oenochrominae) is revised. The genus occurs in New Guinea (i.e., Irian Jaya and part of Papua New Guinea) and Australia. Seventeen species are included, seven of them new. Three genera (Onychopsis Prout, Peratodactyla Turner, and Epicampyla Turner) are newly synonymized with Parepisparis. Larvae are described for two species. The monophyly of Parepisparis is based largely on the shape of the valva of the male genitalia supported, to some extent, by that of the bursa copulatrix of the female genitalia, the colour pattern of the wings and, possibly, the presence of dorsal prothoracic processes and modified setae in the larva. The Oenochrominae are a polyphyletic subfamily, with the Oenochrominae s. str. here confined to the so-called robust-bodied members of the grouping. This excludes the slenderbodied species, and various geometrid genera that have been added to the oenochromines by default.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution