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  • Author or Editor: Man Shun Yeung x
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Abstract

This chapter evaluates Protestant missionary Robert Morrison’s (1782–1834) efforts to engage with teachers and followers of monastic Buddhism in nineteenth-century Canton (Guangzhou in Guangdong Province). From the early 18th to the mid-19th centuries, the Haichuang Buddhist Temple was known to Westerners as a unique venue for Chinese-Western cultural encounters. In addition to its reputation as a famous religious site, the temple printed and distributed large numbers of Buddhist texts, and served as a convenient entry point for Morrison to study Chinese Buddhism. Beginning with an account of the history of the Haichuang temple, this chapter draws on the “Haichuang texts” of the Morrison Collection to evaluate Morrison’s understanding of Chinese Buddhism, his personal interactions with the Haichuang inhabitants, and the wider context of Buddhist-Christian encounters in late imperial China.

In: The Church as Safe Haven
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Abstract

This chapter evaluates Protestant missionary Robert Morrison’s (1782–1834) efforts to engage with teachers and followers of monastic Buddhism in nineteenth-century Canton (Guangzhou in Guangdong Province). From the early 18th to the mid-19th centuries, the Haichuang Buddhist Temple was known to Westerners as a unique venue for Chinese-Western cultural encounters. In addition to its reputation as a famous religious site, the temple printed and distributed large numbers of Buddhist texts, and served as a convenient entry point for Morrison to study Chinese Buddhism. Beginning with an account of the history of the Haichuang temple, this chapter draws on the “Haichuang texts” of the Morrison Collection to evaluate Morrison’s understanding of Chinese Buddhism, his personal interactions with the Haichuang inhabitants, and the wider context of Buddhist-Christian encounters in late imperial China.

In: The Church as Safe Haven
Benjamin Bowen Carter as an Agent of Global Knowledge
Author:
Benjamin Bowen Carter (1771-1831), one of the first Americans to speak and read Chinese, studied Chinese in Canton and advocated its use in diplomacy decades before America established a formal relationship with China. Drawing on rediscovered manuscripts, this book reconstructs Carter’s multilingual learning experience, reveals how he helped translate a diplomatic document into Chinese, describes his interactions with European sinologists, and traces his attempts to convince the US government and American academics of the practical and cultural value of Chinese studies. The cross-cultural perspective employed in this book emphasizes the reciprocal dynamics of Carter’s relationships with Chinese and European “others,” while Carter’s story itself forces a rewriting of the earliest years of US-China relations.
In: An American Pioneer of Chinese Studies in Cross-Cultural Perspective
In: An American Pioneer of Chinese Studies in Cross-Cultural Perspective
In: An American Pioneer of Chinese Studies in Cross-Cultural Perspective
In: An American Pioneer of Chinese Studies in Cross-Cultural Perspective
In: An American Pioneer of Chinese Studies in Cross-Cultural Perspective
In: An American Pioneer of Chinese Studies in Cross-Cultural Perspective
In: An American Pioneer of Chinese Studies in Cross-Cultural Perspective