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Young people are influenced in their worldviews and religious views by the lifeworld they experience outside religious education at schools or in religious communities. In the modern world, youth cultures and the media have become increasingly important for them and function as agencies of socialization beside the family and the religious community. As research shows, young people tend to use youth cultures and the media culture in quite individual and self-defined ways, which has prompted sociologists to speak of "self-socialization." This paper explores some main areas of religious self-so-cialization with a focus on western culture and on those young people who are not closely linked to religious communities. It tries to show that religious self-socialization constitutes an important context for any attempts at religious education that should be taken into account by religious educators.

In: Reaching for the Sky

Young people are influenced in their worldviews and religious views by the lifeworld they experience outside religious education at schools or in religious communities. In the modern world, youth cultures and the media have become increasingly important for them and function as agencies of socialization beside the family and the religious community. As research shows, young people tend to use youth cultures and the media culture in quite individual and self-defined ways, which has prompted sociologists to speak of "self-socialization." This paper explores some main areas of religious self-so-cialization with a focus on western culture and on those young people who are not closely linked to religious communities. It tries to show that religious self-socialization constitutes an important context for any attempts at religious education that should be taken into account by religious educators.

In: Reaching for the Sky
In: Bildung als protestantisches Modell
In: Religious Diversity, State, and Law

Abstract

This paper addresses the relationship of public theology and education, a field of research that has been neglected in theology as well as in educational theory and religious pedagogy. It does so by firstly analyzing the discourse in the public sphere at the intersection of theology and religious education in Germany, and secondly by drawing on the social theories of John Rawls and Jürgen Habermas to provide a framework for relating public theology and (religious) education. In the German context the rediscovery and revaluing of the political dimension of public religious education has led to the evolving concept of ‘public religious pedagogy’, with obvious analogies to public theology—a concept that may have the potential to become a new paradigm in the academic discipline of religious pedagogy. Systematically, the article advances the hypothesis that philosophical discourse on the question of ‘how citizens who remain deeply divided on religious, philosophical, and moral doctrines, can still maintain a just and stable democratic society’ (John Rawls) corresponds to the discourse in educational philosophy and educational science on the question of how a consensus on major objectives of public education in general and the role of religion in this context in particular can be reached. It will be demonstrated that the academic discourse around religious education can benefit from dialogue and interaction with the social theories of (the later) Rawls and Habermas.

In: International Journal of Public Theology

Abstract

This paper explicates the conceptual background, design and first results of the empirical research project “The Rights of the Child and the School Subject of Religious Education” that aims to integrate children’s rights into RE as well as into RE teacher education with a design-based research (DBR) approach. It starts by claiming a central significance of human rights for humanity and social cohesion in society and the world and therefore also for school education. It continues to clarify the relationship between human rights values and religious values and argues for a special potential and obligation of RE for promoting human rights and children’s rights – which is to date only partly fulfilled in German RE. Building upon this, the sub-project “Human Rights Education for Religious Educators(HRE4RE) is introduced. This research demonstrates that it is necessary to establish human rights and children’s rights education for student teachers of RE, in order for them to be able to adequately integrate children’s rights perspectives into school culture as well as into RE for generations to come.

In: Journal of Empirical Theology
»Bildung« ist in weiten Teilen ein Modell des menschlichen Lebenslaufs aus dem Geist des Protestantismus. Diese Deutung sieht in Freiheit, Vernunft und Autonomie die wesentlichen Leitmotive von »Bildung«. Zu klären ist dann einerseits, inwieweit das Modell »Bildung« von seinen religiösen Wurzeln aus weit mehr ein »protestantisches« (Kosselleck) als ein »deutsches« Deutungsmuster (Bollenbeck) ist. »Bildung« wird andererseits für Theologie und Kirche zu einem hermeneutischen Schlüssel, mit dem der Protestantismus selbst unter anthropologischen Vorzeichen gelesen werden kann. Dabei enthält »Bildung« gerade in seiner religiösen Grundierung ein kritisches Potential gegen seine eigene Rezeptionsgeschichte. Die Klärungen reichen von Analysen zum Kontext der Aufklärung bis hin zu aktuellen Fragen der Menschenrechte, der Globalen Bildung oder der Popkultur.