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  • Author or Editor: Manfred Markus x

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Manfred Markus

Abstract

A special sub-corpus of 84 letters from the Innsbruck Letter Corpus (1386 to 1688) was compiled with equal amounts of male and female correspondence of the 15th and 17th centuries, so that they could be analysed contrastively in terms of both gender and time. The purpose of the paper is twofold: (1) In terms of method, it attempts to prove that normalisation is indispensable for retrieval, at least in the case of Middle English and Early Modern English. (2) As a contribution to gender studies, the paper contrasts some pragmatic and stylistic features of the language of women and men, and of the language of the 15th and 17th century. Those analysed are deictic expressions, markers of emphasis, expressions of feeling, and metamessages, as expressed in formulaic I hope, I fear, etc., and pragmatic signals of selfexpression and of appeal. The analysis reveals a few characteristic differences between the two centuries, but its main finding is that women generally show more empathy in their letters, using the channel of communication more actively, more intuitively, and more cooperatively.

Series:

Manfred Markus

Abstract

The purpose of this pilot paper is twofold: namely, first, to present a new Innsbruck corpus called Hedgehogs (Historical English Dictionaries, Grammars and Educational Handbooks of German Schools), which covers the time from 1700 to 1850 and, as yet (2005), exists only in a provisional Internet version of 49 books (mainly German and in a few cases French). The second and main aim of the paper is to test the value of the new corpus in view of features of spokenness, by analysing typically spoken types of sound and syllable reduction, morphemic and lexical colloquialisms, as well as syntactic, semantic, pragmatic and idiomatic features of spoken English.

Series:

Manfred Markus

Abstract

The paper will first provide a short introduction to EDD Online, and then illustrate the potential of its interface by topicalising interjections as a word class and compounding as a productive type of word formation in dialect. In Section 3 the theoretical question of a dictionary used as a corpus will be tackled. Section 4 is dedicated to the contents and structure of Wright’s sources, Section 5 to what he calls “citations”. Quantitatively speaking, probably more than half of Wright’s English Dialect Dictionary (EDD), now available in a beta version from the Innsbruck project EDD Online, consists of citations, i.e. text passages from dialect literature, glossaries or other sources. While these citation passages are meant to illustrate particular lexical points, they are often fairly extensive, so that the idea may occur to isolate them from the rest of the entries to create an autonomous dialect corpus. My paper will investigate the feasibility of this idea, mainly analysing in close-up Wright’s citations and the sources attributed to them. Further aspects to consider will be the dates of sources, as well as the correlation of the sources with dialectal areas and formal features of word formation including compounds, derivations, and phrases. The study will give evidence that the EDD provides not just some kind of a corpus of dialect texts, but a very structured one, with time, place and source being the main parameters.

Series:

Alexander Onysko, Manfred Markus and Reinhard Heuberger

Abstract

The digitised version of Joseph Wright’s English Dialect Dictionary (EDD, 1896–1905) promises to be a lexicographic milestone for English dialect terms and phrases of the 18th and 19th centuries. In a research project in the English Department at the University of Innsbruck, the c.5000 pages of the dictionary have been transferred into machine-readable text and parsed. Our aim is to produce an online version of the dictionary for research on the history of spoken and dialectal Late Modern English. The paper demonstrates the complexity of the entries in the EDD and focuses on the questions of dialect attribution and of the definition of words and phrases as two cases in point. Beyond that, we will provide a survey of the search interface and specifically discuss the implementation of the two issues of dialect area and definition.

Elsas, Christoph, Marquardt, Manfred, Mühling-Schlapkohl, Markus and Mürmel, Heinz

Dunn, James D.G., Felmy, Karl Christian, Grundmann, Christoffer H., Hilberath, Berndt Jochen, Leppin, Volker, Necker, Gerold, Oeming, Manfred, Ritter, Adolf Martin, Schäfer, Peter, Stolz, Fritz, Vinzent, Markus and Wainwright, Geoffrey