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  • Author or Editor: Marc Lanteigne x
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Abstract

The serum protein concentrations of juvenile and mature male snow crabs, Chionoecetes opilio, were measured using a refractometer. The somatic indices of juvenile and mature male snow crab were calculated using the weight of the dry flesh of the chelae versus its wet weight. Results indicate that juvenile male snow crab have significantly higher serum protein concentrations and significantly lower somatic indices than their mature counterparts. These observations are attributed to basic physiological differences that could be explained by a terminal moult. Les concentrations en proteines seriques de males juveniles et a maturite du crabe des neiges Chionoecetes opilio ont ete mesurees au moyen d'un refractometre. Les indices somatiques de ces individus ont ete calcules en utilisant le rapport entre le poids sec et le poids humide de la chair. Les resultats indiquent que les individus males juveniles ont des concentrations en proteines seriques significativement plus elevees et des indices somatiques significativement plus bas que les individus males matures. Ces observations sont attribuees a des differences physiologiques de base qui peuvent etre expliquees par une mue terminale.

In: Crustaceana

Abstract

As China’s cross-regional diplomacy is not separated from the party-state’s overall foreign policy goals and doctrines, this chapter offers a review of China’s foreign policy and economic interests. Without doubt, these dynamics also shape China’s policy in the Arctic. The chapter concludes that Beijing is no longer content to be a norm-taker in international politics but it is more comfortable with becoming a norm-maker. However, there are noteworthy differences between China’s Arctic engagement and its diplomacy in other parts of the world.

In: Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic

Abstract

This chapter summarises the key findings of the book. In particular, it reviews China’s Arctic actorness and the party-state’s contribution to Arctic affairs. It also briefly ponders risks and future prospects of China’s role in the Arctic – a role that the chapter expects to grow in the coming years.

In: Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic

Abstract

This chapter elaborates on China’s evolving strategy in the Arctic. For China, the Arctic is no longer about simply being an observer in the Arctic Council, but much more. The chapter will analyze mainly the specifics of China’s Arctic white paper and examine a pair of specific cases, namely China’s role in negotiating the Polar Code and the Arctic fisheries agreement. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which China’s national policy towards the Arctic has emerged and how it has been viewed by other actors and commentators following China’s role in the Arctic. As a sub-section, China’s policy towards the Arctic’s indigenous peoples will also be studied.

In: Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic

Abstract

The chapter focuses on economic presence of China in the Arctic regions. First, it considers the economic relations between China and the Nordic states, North American Arctic and Russia. China and Chinese actors are active in different ways in different parts of the Arctic. Second, it looks at the key Arctic industries, where China’s role is or may become relevant: shipping, oil and gas, minerals extraction, and tourism. Finally, the chapter considers the two dimensions of concerns related to Chinese economic activities: the problem of economic and political influence gained through investments and the environment and social performance as well as reliability of Chinese companies.

In: Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic