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In: Methods and Methodologies
In: Methods and Methodologies
Aristotelian Logic East and West, 500-1500
Volume Editors: Margaret Cameron and John Marenbon
Methods and Methodologies explores two questions about studying the Aristotelian tradition of logic. The first, addressed by the chapters on methods in the first half of the book, is directly about the medieval logical commentaries, treatises and handbooks. How did medieval authors in the different traditions, Latin and Arabic, go about their work on Aristotelian logic? In particular, how did they themselves conceive the relationship between logic and other branches of philosophy and disciplines outside philosophy? The second question is about methodologies, the subject of the chapters in the second half of the book: it invites writers to reflect on their own and their colleagues’ practice as twenty-first century interpreters of this medieval writing on Aristotelian logic.
Contributors are Sten Ebbesen, Christopher J. Martin, Christophe Erismann, Andrew Arlig, Simo Knuuttila, Amos Bertolacci, Jennifer Ashworth, Paul Thom, Gyula Klima, Matteo di Giovanni and Margaret Cameron.
Jean-Baptiste Du Bos’ Critical Reflections on Poetry and Painting, first published in French in 1719, is one of the seminal works of modern aesthetics. Du Bos rejected the seventeenth-century view that works of art are assessed by reason. Instead, he believed, audience members have sentiments in response to artworks. Their sentiments are fainter versions of those they would feel in response to actually seeing what the work of art imitates. Du Bos was influenced by John Locke’s empiricism and, in turn, had a major impact on virtually every major eighteenth-century contributor to philosophy of art, including Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, Rousseau, Herder, Lessing, Mendelssohn, Kames, Gerard, and Hume. This is the first modern, annotated and scholarly edition of the Critical Reflections in any language.
The series publishes high-quality monographs and coherent collective volumes on medieval philosophy, written in such a way as to make them comprehensible and interesting to mainstream philosophers and historians of philosophy.

Volumes in the series are not required to use medieval philosophy to make a direct contribution to debates in contemporary analytical philosophy (although this is one possibility), but the manner in which the medieval texts are treated should reflect, in an historically sensitive way, the methods and the language of contemporary analytical philosophy – in especial, its ideals of clarity and unpretentiousness. There are many different varieties of this general ‘analytical’ approach, and the series is open to any of them.

The scope of medieval philosophy is taken widely, to include the Arabic, Greek and Jewish traditions, as well as the Latin one, and to run from c.500 to c.1500; works which go on even so far as 1700 may be considered, if they are at least equally concerned with the period before 1500.

• The series provides a forum for both promising early-career scholars as well as established researchers.
• Volumes may consist of essay collections and monographs on substantial subjects, with the exception of unrevised PhD dissertations.
• Books are welcome which bring together different disciplines, so long as they fit the aims of the series.
• All books are refereed, and there will be a requirement of philosophical rigour and impeccable historical and textual scholarship. Essay collections must demonstrate a clear rational and internal coherence.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor, Professor John Marenbon, or the Publisher at Brill, Dr Kate Hammond.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.

The black-spined toad, Duttaphrynus melanostictus, is widespread in South and South-East (SE) Asia, although recent molecular analyses have revealed that it represents a species complex (here called the D. melanostictus complex). Invasive populations of this toad have been detected in Madagascar since, at least, 2014. We here trace the origin of this introduction based on mitochondrial DNA sequences of 340 samples. All 102 specimens from Madagascar have identical sequences pointing to a single introduction event. Their haplotype corresponds to a lineage occurring in Cambodia, China, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, and some locations of eastern Myanmar and northern Malaysia, here named the SE Asian lineage. Within this lineage, specimens from one location in Cambodia and three locations in Vietnam have the same haplotype as found in Madagascar. This includes Ho Chi Minh City, which has a major seaport and might have been the source for the introduction. Species distribution models suggest that the current range of the Madagascan invasive population is within the bioclimatic space occupied by the SE Asian lineage in its native range. The potential invasion zone in Madagascar is narrower than suggested by models from localities representing the full range of the D. melanostictus complex. Thus, an accurate taxonomy is essential for such inferences, but it remains uncertain if the toad might be able to spread beyond the potential suitable range because (1) knowledge on species-delimitation of the complex is insufficient, and (2) the native range in SE Asia might be influenced by historical biogeography or competition.

In: Amphibia-Reptilia