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Myths and Truths – What Has K-12 STEM Education Research Taught Us?
STEM Education 2.0 discusses the most recent research on important selected K-12 STEM topics by synthesizing previous research and offering new research questions. The contributions range from analysis of key STEM issues that have been studied for more than two decades to topics that have more recently became popular, such as maker space and robotics. In each chapter, nationally and internationally known STEM experts review key literature in the field, share findings of their own research with its implications for K-12 STEM education, and finally offer future research areas and questions in the respected area they have been studying. This volume provides diverse and leading voices in the future of STEM education and STEM education research.
In: STEM Education 2.0
In: STEM Education 2.0
In: STEM Education 2.0

Abstract

STEM literacy becomes a synergy of applying the knowledge and skills of STEM to “increase students’ understanding of how things work and improve their use of technologies” (, p. 1) to “study the grand challenges of our era” (, p. 2). Addressing the issues that will present this generation will require the development of the STEM literacy of current students (). Developing STEM literacy must be a multi-faceted. Collaborative of industry and professionals, government support, education with highly qualified teachers, and a society that embraces STEM all feed into creating a STEM literate workforce (Augustine, 2005). Increasing STEM literacy of society, especially the youngest generation, is essential for addressing the issues that face humanity.

In: STEM Education 2.0

Abstract

Research has shown that exposure to a variety of STEM opportunities will have a long-term effect on individuals and the overall STEM education community (Wai, Lubinski, Benbow, & Steiger, 2010). While many opportunities for informal learning have historically existed within the science and history disciplines, such as museums, nature centers, libraries, and national parks (Fenichel & Schweingruber, 2010), there has been a lot of growth in comparable informal learning environments within STEM education (e.g., engineering, integrated STEM). Participation in informal learning environments allows K-12 grade students to delve deeper into STEM concepts, complementing STEM learning in their traditional school setting. In this chapter, we will review the literature on informal STEM learning and examine the effects these authentic learning experiences in the STEM disciplines will have on their interest and motivation towards STEM careers.

In: STEM Education 2.0
In: STEM Education 2.0
In: STEM Education 2.0
In: STEM Education 2.0
In: A Practice-based Model of STEM Teaching