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Abstract

This chapter discusses the inspiration MacDiarmid’s new Scots-language poetry provided for Smith, although the New Zealand-born poet had had no previous contact with Scots-language culture. Nevertheless, Smith became a prominent Scots-language member of the second phase of the Scottish Renaissance poetry revival. The chapter explores the similarities and differences between Smith’s and MacDiarmid’s approaches to the Scots language as, for example, in Smith’s involvement in the attempt to develop a standard of Scots for poetry purposes as opposed to MacDiarmid’s more haphazard ‘apostrophe’ activity. The chapter also explores differences in the thematic nature of their poetry. ‘Back to Dunbar’ did not have the same meaning for Smith as it had for MacDiarmid. The influence of the Classics in Smith’s writing will be discussed as will Smith’s visual imagination in relation to MacDiarmid’s emphasis on the ‘soon’, no’ sense, that faddoms the herts o’ men’. In conclusion, the chapter considers whether the reputation of both poets has been unfairly restricted by their decision to write a modern(ist) poetry in Scots.

In: Sydney Goodsir Smith, Poet

Robin Jenkins’s novels offer ironical narratives of ambivalence and equivocation, of apparent hypocrisy, of lives and motivations being other than what they seem. This chapter will explore contrasts in Jenkins’s depiction of innocence and corruption with brief reference to a range of his fiction but with more extended discussion of these contrasting but equivocal qualities in the contemporary urban setting of Just Duffy, published in 1988, and the historical setting of Lady Magdalen, a late novel set in the early seventeenth century in the context of the conflict between Charles i and the Covenanters over the introduction of bishops into the Scottish Presbyterian Kirk. Although relationships with specific fiction by Muriel Spark will not be directly addressed, the discussion of Jenkins’s exploration of false consciousness and self-delusion will implicitly bring together their shared interest in ‘a kind of truth’ in regard to human life.

In: The Fiction of Robin Jenkins
In: The Scottish Sixties

Abstract

This chapter discusses the inspiration MacDiarmid’s new Scots-language poetry provided for Smith, although the New Zealand-born poet had had no previous contact with Scots-language culture. Nevertheless, Smith became a prominent Scots-language member of the second phase of the Scottish Renaissance poetry revival. The chapter explores the similarities and differences between Smith’s and MacDiarmid’s approaches to the Scots language as, for example, in Smith’s involvement in the attempt to develop a standard of Scots for poetry purposes as opposed to MacDiarmid’s more haphazard ‘apostrophe’ activity. The chapter also explores differences in the thematic nature of their poetry. ‘Back to Dunbar’ did not have the same meaning for Smith as it had for MacDiarmid. The influence of the Classics in Smith’s writing will be discussed as will Smith’s visual imagination in relation to MacDiarmid’s emphasis on the ‘soon’, no’ sense, that faddoms the herts o’ men’. In conclusion, the chapter considers whether the reputation of both poets has been unfairly restricted by their decision to write a modern(ist) poetry in Scots.

In: Sydney Goodsir Smith, Poet
In: The Scottish Sixties
In: The Fiction of Robin Jenkins

Robin Jenkins’s novels offer ironical narratives of ambivalence and equivocation, of apparent hypocrisy, of lives and motivations being other than what they seem. This chapter will explore contrasts in Jenkins’s depiction of innocence and corruption with brief reference to a range of his fiction but with more extended discussion of these contrasting but equivocal qualities in the contemporary urban setting of Just Duffy, published in 1988, and the historical setting of Lady Magdalen, a late novel set in the early seventeenth century in the context of the conflict between Charles i and the Covenanters over the introduction of bishops into the Scottish Presbyterian Kirk. Although relationships with specific fiction by Muriel Spark will not be directly addressed, the discussion of Jenkins’s exploration of false consciousness and self-delusion will implicitly bring together their shared interest in ‘a kind of truth’ in regard to human life.

In: The Fiction of Robin Jenkins