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Maria Assunção Flores

Abstract

In this chapter I look at major trends in becoming and being a teacher in Portugal and Spain in adverse times. Even though I take into consideration existing international literature, I will focus on some of the key aspects that characterise the teaching profession and teacher education in Iberia by drawing upon empirical work carried out in both countries. The intention is not to do an exhaustive literature review nor to undertake a state of the art. Rather, my aim is to look at major trends characterising teaching and teachers’ work as well as teacher education in terms of current challenges in order to identify possible directions. Contradictory trends may be identified in the ways in which teacher professionalism has been defined as well as in real conditions of teachers’ work in schools and classrooms with implications for teacher education.

Sandra Fernandes, Maria Assunção Flores and Rui M. Lima

The Bologna Process has introduced a number of changes in Higher Education institutions, namely in curricula restructuring and in new methodologies of teaching and assessing, amongst others. Also of importance is the need to improve student achievement which has to focus not only upon the development of technical competencies, but also upon the development of transversal competencies. This paper aims to give an overview of an ongoing and broader piece of research on impact assessment of Project-Led Education (PLE) on students’ learning, and its contribution to the improvement of teaching and learning in Higher Education. It is based on a longitudinal approach with first year Industrial Management and Engineering students, who participated in PLE experiences. For this, the CIPP (Context, Input, Process, Product) Evaluation Model was used as a framework for evaluating the impact of the programme (Stufflebeam, 2003). Data were collected through qualitative and quantitative research methods, according to the four dimensions of evaluation in CIPP. Findings suggest that the CIPP Model provided a broad understanding of the evaluation process, thus linking the evaluation and decision-making processes. Data collected from students, in regard to PLE processes and outcomes, showed a stronger articulation between theory and practice, which improved learning and increased student motivation. The project was considered a good way to develop not only technical skills, but also important transversal competencies such as project management, problem solving, communication skills and teamwork. Greater involvement of students in the assessment process and the need to clarify and share a common understanding of the tutor’s role, mostly amongst tutors themselves, were some of the key issues for further improvement that emerged from the data collected.

Sandra Fernandes, Maria Assunção Flores and Rui M. Lima

Back to the Future

Legacies, Continuities and Changes in Educational Policy, Practice and Research

Edited by Maria Assunção Flores, Ana Amélia Carvalho, Fernando Ilídio Ferreira and Maria Teresa Vilaça

Schools and teachers are facing various challenges in a rapidly changing world. In such circumstances, discussing and sharing concerns of mutual interest regarding policy, practice and research is crucial to creating more sophisticated understandings of the various challenges as a first step in the improvement of education. While the future should not be imprisoned in the past, the past does provide valuable lessons that will undergo new iterations in constructing the future. The future will be multi-faceted and complex and the different chapters included in this book are intended to provide important contributions from which to build the future of education.
The different chapters provide readers with international perspectives, frameworks and empirical evidence of legacies, continuities and changes in educational policy, practice and research in teaching, teacher education and learning. We hope that they inspire the readers to build the future and to change their own professional realities.

Maria Assunção Flores, Ana Amélia Carvalho, Fernando Ilídio Ferreira and Maria Teresa Vilaça

Maria Assunção Flores, Ana Amélia Carvalho, Fernando Ilídio Ferreira and Maria Teresa Vilaça

Maria Assunção Flores, Ana Amélia Carvalho, Fernando Ilídio Ferreira and Maria Teresa Vilaça