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Editor-in-Chief: Maria Ela Atienza
The Philippine Political Science Journal (PPSJ) is an internationally refereed journal and the official publication of the Philippine Political Science Association (PPSA). The PPSJ welcomes articles dealing with the politics and international relations of Southeast Asia. Manuscripts may focus on individual countries of the region but comparative articles about the countries in the region and the region as a whole are especially welcome.

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This paper analyzes the dynamics of health devolution in the Philippines within the context of the 1991 Local Government Code. The paper looks into how the present level of health devolution came about, the reform's impact on the public health system, and the factors involved in improving health service delivery in municipalities under a devolved set up. There are several variables that are tested as possible intervening variables. These are prioritization of health services in resource allocation and management, adequacy of formal health personnel and facilities, and citizens' participation in health service delivery. The sociopolitical context of the local government is also explored. Two case studies are presented to support the arguments of the paper.

In: Philippine Political Science Journal

This paper examines the impact of globalization and the responses of farming communities in Bilar, a municipality in the province of Bohol, Philippines. In particular, it looks at the impact of the Plant Variety Protection Act of 2002, one expression of the Philippine government’s commitment to the World Trade Organization’s Agreement on Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights. It uses everyday politics and history from below as frameworks of analysis and takes into consideration the strategic relations of contexts and actors. This paper also looks into and assesses the perceptions and courses of action taken by farmers as they interact with civil society groups and local and national governments in response to the effects of the law. The findings suggest that while the law has no direct impact yet in the community, different groups of farmers have different responses to it. Some farmers have taken a more proactive role in ensuring safeguards to their livelihood and traditional seed systems against the perceived threats posed by the law with the assistance of a non-government organization. Other farmers have reservations about the pro-active actions of the first group of farmers and continue with their traditional systems.

In: Philippine Political Science Journal
In: Philippine Political Science Journal