Search Results

This article provides a short survey of the avenues of research opened up by the study of the Qurʾān manuscripts in the Al-Biruni Institute in Tashkent, the largest public collection of Islamic manuscripts in Central Asia. The author, who is preparing a catalogue of the Qurʾāns held by the Institute, gives a succinct overview of the history and the organization of the collections. The research perspectives outlined by the author concern the shorter versions of the Qurʾāns made for talismanic and devotional purposes (haftiyak and panj sūra), the everyday use of common manuscripts, illuminations in the luxury manuscripts and particularities of the bindings. If properly pursued, these leads will provide insights into many aspects of the culture of book making in Central Asia in the pre-modern period.

In: Journal of Islamic Manuscripts
In: L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe siècle au début du XXe siècle
In: L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe siècle au début du XXe siècle
In: L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe siècle au début du XXe siècle
In: L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe siècle au début du XXe siècle
In: L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe siècle au début du XXe siècle
In: L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe siècle au début du XXe siècle
In: L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe siècle au début du XXe siècle
In: L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe siècle au début du XXe siècle
In: L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe siècle au début du XXe siècle