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Edited by Marijke Gijswijt-Hofstra and Roy Porter

Anti-psychiatry' is a movement more sloganized than analysed. Until now it has been associated in the English-speaking world primarily with R.D. Laing and a coterie of his associates, and a radical critique not just of psychiatric hospitalization but of the very premises of psychiatry itself and the basic institutions of society, especially the family.
But are these notions accurate, or rather distorted images, created by Laing himself or by the media? In this book, which has emerged out of an Anglo-Dutch conference held in June 1997, the realities of critical psychiatry are explored, using comparisons and contrasts between the British and the Dutch experiences as a probe. There were, it turns out, various distinct anti-psychiatries - indeed, hardly anybody actually used that label about themselves - and they played a role in the reform no less than the rejection of regular psychiatry.
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Cultures of Neurasthenia

From Beard to the First World War

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Edited by Marijke Gijswijt-Hofstra and Roy Porter

Neurasthenia, meaning nerve weakness, was ‘invented’ in the United States as a disorder of modernity, caused by the fast pace of urban life. Soon after, from the early 1880s onwards, this modern disease crossed the Atlantic. Neurasthenia became much less ‘popular’ in Britain or the Netherlands than in Germany. Neurasthenia’s heyday continued into the first decade of the twentieth century. The label referred to conditions similar to those currently labelled as chronic fatigue syndrome. Why this rise and fall of neurasthenia, and why these differences in popularity?
This book, which emerged out of an Anglo-Dutch-German conference held in June 2000, explores neurasthenia’s many-sided history from a comparative perspective.
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Edited by Marijke Gijswijt-Hofstra and Hilary Marland

The health and welfare of children became an area of concern and action in the early decades of the twentieth century. This concern would develop an ever-broader remit during the course of the century, moving from anxiety about high death rates, physical health and the ‘unfit’, to embrace all children and the mental health and the psychological well-being of individuals.
This volume emerged out of an Anglo-Dutch Workshop held at the University of Warwick in July 1999, and is the first book to explore child health in the twentieth century in a comparative perspective, focussing on such issues as the link between child health and citizenship, the impact of ideas concerning degeneracy, socialisation, consumerism and children’s rights, and the role of the family, state and experts in mediating child health.
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Marijke Gijswijt-Hofstra and Hilary Marland

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Marijke Gijswijt-Hofstra and Hilary Marland

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Marijke Gijswijt-Hofstra and Hilary Marland