Canada is often characterised as a mosaic for world cultures while contending with the difficulty of defining its national identity. Canada’s confederation in 1867 was influenced by the fear that then-British North America was at risk from the United States’ internal conflicting forces. This sense of vulnerability bred the desire to strengthen the position of the British North American colonies while avoiding the violent internal conflicts which plagued its southern neighbour. In the decades since its formation, Canadian political parties have learnt that national campaigns, not regional or local ones, tend to have the greatest impact upon voters’ intentions in Canadian federal elections. As the North has come to provide Canadians with a subject of national significance and resonance, the North has come to be increasingly seen as an important symbol of the country and an important component of Canada’s domestic politics. Understanding the relationship dynamics of the Canadian Armed Forces, the Government of Canada and the idea of the North in Canada has broader implications for states wishing to cooperate or negotiate with Canada on matters pertaining to Canada’s Northern region.

In: Facing Our Darkness: Manifestations of Fear, Horror and Terror
Within the broad range of the history, religion, society, and literature of the ancient Near East, titles in this series may treat an individual text or a topic that extends across a variety of texts and other sources. While the text or topic often has to do with the Hebrew Bible and ancient Israel, it can focus on other ancient Near Eastern cultures. Published volumes may be revised doctoral dissertations or other scholarly works of comparable importance.

The Harvard Semitic Monographs series publishes volumes from the Harvard Semitic Museum. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Harvard Semitic Studies and Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant, https://semiticmuseum.fas.harvard.edu/publications.
With a focus on Semitic philology and linguistics, this series includes descriptive, comparative, historical, and lexical studies. Volumes may focus on a particular language or body of texts within a language, or they may be grammars for use in teaching a language, or collections of essays with a broader scope.

The Harvard Semitic Studies series publishes volumes from the Harvard Semitic Museum. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant and Harvard Semitic Monographs, https://semiticmuseum.fas.harvard.edu/publications.
Published in a quarto-size format to allow for illustrations, volumes in this series focus on archaeological and historical topics, either as monographs or as collections of essays.

The Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant series publishes volumes from the Harvard Semitic Museum. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Harvard Semitic Studies and Harvard Semitic Monographs, https://semiticmuseum.fas.harvard.edu/publications.

Here we report the genome sequence of the lesion nematode, Pratylenchus coffeae, a significant pest of banana and other staple crops in tropical and sub-tropical regions worldwide. Initial analysis of the 19.67 Mb genome reveals 6712 protein encoding genes, the smallest number found in a metazoan, although sufficient to make a nematode. Significantly, no developmental or physiological pathways are obviously missing when compared to the model free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which possesses approximately 21 000 genes. The highly streamlined P. coffeae genome may reveal a remarkable functional plasticity in nematode genomes and may also indicate evolutionary routes to increased specialisation in other nematode genera. In addition, the P. coffeae genome may begin to reveal the core set of genes necessary to make a multicellular animal. Nematodes exhibit striking diversity in the niches they occupy, and the sequence of P. coffeae is a tool to begin to unravel the mechanisms that enable the extraordinary success of this phylum as both free-living and parasitic forms. Unlike the sedentary endoparasitic root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), P. coffeae is a root-lesion nematode that does not establish a feeding site within the root. Because the P. coffeae nematode genome encodes fewer than half the number of genes found in the genomes of root-knot nematodes, comparative analysis to determine genes P. coffeae does not carry may help to define development of more sophisticated forms of nematode-plant interactions. The P. coffeae genome sequence may help to define timelines related to evolution of parasitism amongst nematodes. The genome of P. coffeae is a significant new tool to understand not only nematode evolution but animal biology in general.

In: Nematology