Mark Nixon

This essay uses Beckett's 1936 reference to a specifically German 'associative complex' to examine its aesthetic and creative manifestations. Drawing on notebook material and correspondences from the 1930s, the essay reveals the importance of Beckett's extensive reading of German literature precipitating his move from a recondite mode of writing to one that would allow his writing to issue more directly from his own personal pressures. Beckett's project of self-writing is traced to its culmination in the German Diaries of 1936-37 and a new project entitled the "Journal of a Melancholic" formulated in its pages.

Mark Nixon

This essay surveys Beckett's response to Romantic literature and painting in the 1930s. It examines the way he dismissed its sentimentality and elaborate style but was attracted to a particular strand of Romanticism that portrayed a melancholic sensibility.

Mark Nixon

This paper examines the way in which the two Swiss writers Max Frisch and Friedrich Dürrenmatt responded to Beckett's work. Both of these authors profoundly engaged with Beckett's dramatic and novelistic texts in their writings on theatre, and read him as being apart, rather than a part of, the Theatre of the Absurd. Frisch, in particular, was ostensibly interested in, and to a certain degree influenced by Beckett's work. At the same time, this essay charts Beckett's own reading of Frisch and his reactions on seeing his plays in performance. Finally, a shared emphasis on form and autographical writing is examined through a reading of Frisch's novel and Beckett's .

Mark Nixon

This paper examines the function and meaning of rivers, and other bodies of water, in Beckett's texts of the 1930s, concentrating in particular on . The specific use of rivers and by extension bridges as textual and structural devices in underlines the narrative's oscillations between movement and stasis, and prefigures Beckett's development of an aesthetic focusing on what the essay "Recent Irish Poetry" calls the "space that intervenes."

Conor Carville and Mark Nixon

Conor Carville and Mark Nixon

Conor Carville and Mark Nixon