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In: Yearbook of International Disaster Law Online

There is no doubt that disasters carry important implications for the effective enjoyment of human rights, and that States have to take into account their obligations under international and regional human rights instruments in disaster management activities throughout the whole disaster management cycle. This section reviews how international and regional human rights bodies have made practical contributions to the clarification of relevant rights and obligations in 2018. As seen by the following examples, there is currently a real appetite, if not a proper momentum, for the adoption of interpretative statements and even legal instruments that consolidate clear, easily accessible and coherent

Open Access
In: Yearbook of International Disaster Law Online
Introduction

The field of international environmental law is highly relevant to the prevention of, preparedness for, response to and recovery from disasters. Most obviously, environmental law is important because poorly managed environmentally hazardous situations can directly cause or contribute to the occurrence of both slow-onset and sudden-onset disasters, while various disaster events, such as oil spills, volcanic eruptions, forest fires or climate disasters can also lead to widespread, irreparable environmental damage, including to vulnerable habitats and eco-systems as protected under international treaties. 1 In addition, as discussed below, it is increasingly recognised that environmental treaties may be instrumental

Open Access
In: Yearbook of International Disaster Law Online

This article includes a comprehensive analysis of work currently being carried out by regional and international human rights supervisory bodies in the field of disaster management, being cognizant of the fact that the past decade has seen an increased international concern for the adequate protection of persons affected by disasters. Taking on board suggestions by Walter Kälin that effective disaster management encompasses three distinct phases, i.e. preparedness, response and recovery, jointly constituting a full ‘cycle of protection’, this paper analyzes the pronouncements of bodies specifically against this backdrop. The article argues that human rights bodies have already started to engage in clarifying human rights obligations in all these phases, which is important because our improved understanding of the (man-made) causes and consequences of disasters, and any pre-existing vulnerabilities that exacerbate impacts, might require a more holistic approach to managing disaster settings generally, including from a perspective of human rights.

In: Tilburg Law Review

In 2020, UN human rights law practice was of course heavily shaped by the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, a global health crisis, 1 that could easily be qualified as a ‘disaster’ situation due to its overwhelming and seriously disruptive nature, the extent of injuries and casualties inflicted, 2 but also the demonstrated importance of adequate hazardous risk assessment, mitigation, preparation and response.

The application of human rights to the COVID-19 pandemic is well covered by the Yearbook’s thematic section this year. 3 Therefore, this section only gives a short summary of developments

Open Access
In: Yearbook of International Disaster Law Online

This special issue on International Law for the Sustainable Development Goals has a rich history to it, and a few thoughts should be shared in this regard. The papers included in this special issue resulted from a workshop series on the theme of International Law for the Sustainable Development Goals, organised by the Department of Transboundary Legal Studies at the Faculty of Law, University of Groningen between May 2017 and February 2019. The series built on a prior seminar series organised by what was formerly known as the Department of International Law in 2013–2014, on

Open Access
In: Brill Open Law
In: Yearbook of International Disaster Law Online
The Yearbook of International Disaster Law aims to represent a hub for critical debate in this emerging area of research and policy and to foster the interest of academics, practitioners, stakeholders and policy-makers on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made hazards. This Yearbook primarily addresses the international law dimension of relevant topics, alongside important regional and national dimensions relevant for further development of legal and policy initiatives. In the Thematic Section of Volume 3, entitled ‘Health and International Disaster Law’ distinguished scholars debate legal and institutional implications of the Covid-19 pandemic and health emergencies in relation to several emerging or neglected topics.
The Yearbook is also available online. To learn more about the online version, please click here.

The Yearbook of International Disaster Law aims to represent a hub for critical debate in this emerging area of research and policy and to foster the interest of academics, practitioners, stakeholders and policy-makers on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made hazards. This Yearbook primarily addresses the international law dimension of relevant topics, alongside important regional and national dimensions relevant for further development of legal and policy initiatives.

Volume One features a thematic section on the Draft Articles of the ILC on the “Protection of Persons in the Event of Disasters” as well as a general selection of articles, and an international and regional review of International Disaster Law in Practice, plus book reviews and bibliography.

The Yearbook is also available online. To learn more about the online version, please click here.
The Yearbook is also available online. To learn more about the online version, please click here.

The Yearbook of International Disaster Law aims to represent a hub for critical debate in this emerging area of research and policy and to foster the interest of academics, practitioners, stakeholders and policy-makers on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made hazards. This Yearbook primarily addresses the international law dimension of relevant topics, alongside important regional and national dimensions relevant for further development of legal and policy initiatives.

Volume One features a thematic section on the Draft Articles of the ILC on the “Protection of Persons in the Event of Disasters” as well as a general selection of articles, and an international and regional review of International Disaster Law in Practice, plus book reviews and bibliography.