Author: Martin Žemla

This paper outlines the life, work, and views of Adam Huber of Riesenpach (1545-1613). Huber was one of the personal physicians to Rudolf II in Prague, a pharmacist, translator, pedagogue, progressive academic and chancellor at Prague University, aiming to re-establish its medical faculty. Here, I will first appraise Huber as a distinguished translator of medical books published by the prominent Prague printer Daniel Adam of Veleslavín (1546-1599) and as a scholar who helped establish Czech medical terminology, most notably through his new translation of the great Herbal of Pietro Andrea Mattioli (1501-1577), which he reworked and expanded. In the second part, the article focuses on a popular book on regimen, the De conservanda valetudine (1576) by the German humanist author and politician Heinrich Rantzau (1526-1598),translated into Czech by Huber in 1587. The text and its translation are analysed against the backdrop of the new, more specifically Paracelsian, approaches in medicine. The author’s views are compared with Huber’s own ideas expressed in his foreword and in several of his other texts. His distinctive emphases and views are analysed, particularly in relation to Paracelsian medicine, Renaissance (and notably Piconian) concepts of man, and astrology.


In: Early Science and Medicine
Author: Martin Žemla

Abstract

The Astronomia Olympi novi andthe Theologia Cabalistica were published as part of the Philosophia Mystica (1618). This influential collection of Paracelsian and Weigelian texts was among the first to include a publication of the theologica of Paracelsus. Both of these short pseudo-Paracelsian works were written by Adam Haslmayr (1560-1630), the propagator of the “Theophrastia Sancta,” a philosophical theology of Paracelsus mixed with Weigelian and alchemical influences. These works, taken in the Philosophia Mystica,are among the very few of his texts that appeared in print in his lifetime. In this paper, the content of both pseudepigrapha is analyzed and related to ideas found in both the authentic and the pseudepigraphic works of Paracelsus, as well as in relevant works of some Paracelsians (Khunrath, Figulus, Weigel, Croll, Siebmacher and Mögling). Specifically, the notions of the “Olympus novus” and the “cabalistic principles” are discussed in a wider context.

In: Early Science and Medicine