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Martin William Mittelstadt

Abstract

Given Pentecostal proclivity to (Luke-) Acts, it should come as no surprise that Pentecostals consider the work of the prolific Richard Pervo. In this essay, I offer a synopsis and evaluation of his work, particularly four recent volumes, on Acts for the Pneuma readership. On one hand, Pervo proves controversial (not only for Pentecostals) concerning questions about authorship, date, and historicity. On the other hand, Pervo offers fine insight on literary conventions and thematic motifs employed by the author of the Third Gospel and Acts. In the end, I suggest that a careful reading of Pervo produces some profit for readers. As for delight, this will depend on the reader’s needs and interests.

Martin William Mittelstadt

Abstract

The emergence of Pentecostal scholarship in the last quarter century set the stage for fresh and ongoing dialogue concerning the relationship between Pauline and Lukan pneumatologies in the broader scholarly community. The collection of articles, theses, dissertations, and monographs attempting to chart and settle this relationship increases annually. To this collection, Asian scholar Youngmo Cho submits a valuable addition. In his 'Spirit and Kingdom in the Writings of Luke and Paul', Cho, as suggested by the subtitle, proposes 'An Attempt to Reconcile these Concepts.' Originally written as his PhD thesis at the University of Aberdeen under Andrew Clarke, this revised thesis is sure to contribute to the continuing discussion not only in Pentecostal circles but in the broader academic world. A detailed theologian Cho utilizes strong exegetical, lexicographical, and hermeneutical instincts to explore the unique early Christian contribution of Paul's innovative pneumatology against Luke's traditional intertestamental pneumatology. In this review essay I offer a thorough synopsis of Cho's work followed by a brief evaluation.

Martin W. Mittelstadt