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Author: Martin Pogačar

The author discusses online ab-uses of Yugoslav socialist past in contemporary politico-historical and pop-cultural appropriations in the context of EU-accession processes of post-Yugoslav countries. Taking into consideration the wide array of practices and strategies of (re)narrativisation, remediation and repurposing of the Yugoslav past enabled and/or facilitated by the Internet enabling technologies, the author addresses the possibilities and potentialities of YouTube as a platform where various facets of the past can be published, distributed and, thus, entered into public debate. The paper examines a case of remediation and repurposing of socialist audiovisual heritage on YouTube (sounds and images edited into digital memorials or guerrilla historical statements or v.i.t.a. memorials). The author argues that the ideological pillars of Yugoslav socialist past, such as WWII and anti-fascism, feature today as mobilisatory potential and channel for externalisation of ideas related to internationalism, even cosmopolitanism in the EU-accessionrelated debates. This will facilitate an investigation of how the Yugoslav past in post-socialist digital media becomes subject to politicisation and mediation of memory.

In: Navigating Landscapes of Mediated Memory
Author: Martin Pogačar

In the newly established post-socialist states, which largely experienced an annihilation or revision of their socialist pasts, renarrativisations of the past in the era of ubiquitous media feature prominently. One of the many means available to re-appropriate the past (in the case of the former Yugoslavia) is the emergent medium of photo/video/audio blogging, i.e., blogs that employ video-image-text-audio to renarrate and preserve the disappearing facets of Yugoslav popular culture. This paper interrogates the potential of mublogging for preserving/archiving the remnants of popular culture and everyday life.

In: New Media and the Politics of Online Communities
Author: Martin Pogačar

Imagining, interpreting and appropriating the past in the digital age is a complex and manifold set of practices and processes that increasingly employ audio-visual components (sound, image, video) in addition to classical textual narrativisations. The interspersing of video-image-text-audio (v.i.t.a.) has become widely used in digital storytelling, particularly in terms of production, dissemination and consumption of digital content. Among others, the uses of digital technologies in narrating the past span official (museums) and unofficial (digital storytelling, blogging, websites) narrativisations, and problematise the role of national meta-narratives. This is particularly true in the newly established post-socialist states, which have experienced a thorough revision - sometimes an outright annihilation - of their socialist pasts; thus narrativisations of the past in digital media ecology feature prominently. One of the many means available to re-appropriate and reconfigure the past is the medium of music blogging, which employs v.i.t.a. to narrativise and preserve the disappearing facets of Yugoslav popular culture. In this chapter the author interrogates the potential of such blogging for preserving and archiving popular music from the former Yugoslavia. To that end the author analyses two blogs in terms of content management and its implications for the mediation of memories.

In: Cybercultures
Author: Martin Pogačar

Imagining, interpreting and appropriating the past in the digital age is a complex and manifold set of practices and processes that increasingly employ audio-visual components (sound, image, video) in addition to classical textual narrativisations. The interspersing of video-image-text-audio (v.i.t.a.) has become widely used in digital storytelling, particularly in terms of production, dissemination and consumption of digital content. Among others, the uses of digital technologies in narrating the past span official (museums) and unofficial (digital storytelling, blogging, websites) narrativisations, and problematise the role of national meta-narratives. This is particularly true in the newly established post-socialist states, which have experienced a thorough revision - sometimes an outright annihilation - of their socialist pasts; thus narrativisations of the past in digital media ecology feature prominently. One of the many means available to re-appropriate and reconfigure the past is the medium of music blogging, which employs v.i.t.a. to narrativise and preserve the disappearing facets of Yugoslav popular culture. In this chapter the author interrogates the potential of such blogging for preserving and archiving popular music from the former Yugoslavia. To that end the author analyses two blogs in terms of content management and its implications for the mediation of memories.

In: Cybercultures
In: The Media of Memory
Author: Martin Pogačar

This article argues that after the disintegration of Yugoslavia, Yugoslav rock music lost little cultural value and is still a prominent trigger of vernacular memories of the socialist Yugoslav past, as well as a vehicle of socio-political commentary in post-Yugoslav contexts. In this view, music is understood as a galvaniser of affective relationships to that past and to post-Yugoslav presents. In the first part of the article, the author discusses the theoretical and practical implications of digitally mediated music as immersive affective environments, working within the framework of media archaeology and a digital archives approach. It is argued that Yugoslav rock has retained its potency and appeal, where today, in a post-Yugoslavia context, it presents an outlet for the recomposition of musical preferences through nostalgia and opposition to the post-1991 socio-political developments. In the second part of the article, focusing on Facebook and YouTube, the author investigates how Yugoslav rock has been reframed in social media and how fragments of the country’s past are reframed in digital media environments. A qualitative multimodal discourse analysis is employed here to investigate a selection of fan pages of rock musicians and bands.

In: Southeastern Europe
In: The Media of Memory
Blick ins Buch

This book explores the nexus of media and memory practices in contemporary Slovenia. In the age of mediatised societies, the country’s post-socialist, post-Yugoslav present has become saturated with historical revisionism and various nostalgic framings of the past.
Pušnik and Luthar have collected a wide range of case studies analysing the representation and reinterpretation of past events in newspapers, theatre, music, museums, digital media, and documentaries. The volume thus presents insights into the intricacies of the mediatisation of memory in contemporary Slovenian society.
The authors engage with dynamic uses of media today and provide new analyses of media culture as archive, site of historical reinterpretation, and repository of memory.