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  • Author or Editor: Martin Treml x
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1. ‘Immortality’ denotes an eternal duration of life, an existence without end and death. Principally, it counts as a characteristic of God or the gods, and constitutes one of the most important differences between their existence and that of human beings, Epic of Gilgamesh, 10, 3, 1–5. who are therefore called ‘mortals.’ However, there are various approaches and transitions. The gods can die—only after a very long life, granted—as they, too (e.g. in certain Eastern religions), are caught in the chain of rebirths (samsara). In addition, most religions celebrate extraordinary persons, who are snatched away at their death and—like Hercules—deified, in an ‘apotheosis.’ Human immortality is duration beyond death, and requires that the latter not have occurred, or have been overcome, and existence to have been transformed: rebirth or resurrection. Human immortality is usually connected with the supposition of a soul.

in The Brill Dictionary of Religion Online
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1. By “local devotion” is meant the veneration of one or more higher powers in a particular → place, usually practiced by persons of a restricted group. These powers are effective only in limited ways, and they make no claim to generality. It may be a matter of numinous objects, protectors of a home, patrons of the → family, mythic tribal → ancestors, a matter of → heroes of various extraction, or, indeed, of gods, to whom an area, a grove, a precisely defined space, is assigned. It is their possession, or dedicated to them. Although not per se something completely different, visits to the holy places of the scriptural religions are not generally reckoned as local devotion—prayer at the Western Wall of the temple in Jerusalem, assistance at a pontifical Mass in Saint Peter's Basilica, or the pilgrimage to → Mecca. Veneration of the universal God of these religions is in principle possible always and everywhere. Here, then, it is a matter of, for example, a → pilgrimage, or of a (usually) once-in-a-lifetime visit to a place of religious importance, and is usually regarded as a matter of religious merit.

in The Brill Dictionary of Religion Online
in The Brill Dictionary of Religion Online
In: Warburgs Denkraum
In: Warburgs Denkraum
In: Rom rückwärts