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Alynna Lyon and Mary Fran Malone

Abstract

What leads a country's population to support or oppose peacekeeping operations? Are there cross-national diff erences in public support for peacekeeping? In this paper, we aim to answer these questions by examining public attitudes towards peacekeeping operations in the United States and ten European nations (France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, the United Kingdom, Poland, Slovakia, and Turkey). is paper also assesses several explanations for cross-national variations in support for these missions. More specifi cally, we aim to determine whether theories of risk assessment, elite cues, and policy objectives can explain public support for peacekeeping cross-nationally.

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Shannon I. Smithey and Mary Fran T. Malone

Abstract

Crime poses a formidable obstacle to democratization in many parts of the developing world. New democracies in Central America and sub-Saharan Africa face some of the highest homicide rates in the world. Politicians, citizens, and policy-makers have raised the alarm about the growing tide of criminality. Public insecurity, coupled with inefficient and often corrupt justice systems, makes democratization uncertain. Even if new democracies do not revert to dictatorship, the quality of democracy may suffer if crime continues to rise. One particularly vulnerable component of democracy is the rule of law, as public insecurity may fuel support for extra-legal justice, and a willingness to disregard the law while aggressively pursuing suspected criminals. To test these relationships, we assess the ways in which criminal victimization, as well as fear of crime, affect citizen support for the rule of law. We utilize public opinion data collected in select countries in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa through two widely used sources – the Latin American Public Opinion Project (LAPOP) and the Afrobarometer surveys.

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Malone Mary Fran T. and Chavda Roslyn K.

What leads peacekeeping forces to secure the support of the people they serve? This paper answers this question by examining public support for MINUSTAH, the peacekeeping force currently deployed in Haiti. Our analysis of public opinion data finds that in Haiti, peacekeepers have not fared much better than most domestic institutions in terms of legitimacy. We find that both before and after the 2010 earthquake, public support for peacekeepers trailed the low levels of support for domestic institutions. To understand why MINUSTAH has struggled to earn the support of the people it serves, we examine public evaluations of the peacekeeping mission and identify the determinants of support for peacekeepers, focusing in particular on the role of service provision in predicting people’s support for MINUSTAH.