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In: Comparative Sociology
In: Comparative Sociology
In: Comparative Sociology
In: International Journal of Comparative Sociology
In: International Journal of Comparative Sociology
Trust in Contemporary Society, by well-known trust researchers, deals with conceptual, theoretical and social interaction analyses, historical data on societies, national surveys or cross-national comparative studies, and methodological issues related to trust. The authors are from a variety of disciplines: psychology, sociology, political science, organizational studies, history, and philosophy, and from Britain, the United States, the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Australia, Germany, and Japan. They bring their vast knowledge from different historical and cultural backgrounds to illuminate contemporary issues of trust and distrust. The socio-cultural perspective of trust is important and increasingly acknowledged as central to trust research. Accordingly, future directions for comparative trust research are also discussed.

Contributors include: Jack Barbalet, John Brehm, Geoffrey Hosking, Robert Marsh, Barbara A. Misztal, Guido Möllering, Bart Nooteboom, Ken J. Rotenberg, Jiří Šafr, Masamichi Sasaki, Meg Savel, Markéta Sedláčková, Jörg Sydow, Piotr Sztompka.
Values and Attitudes across Nations and Time contributes to an ever-growing body of work focussing on the elucidation of variations in values and attitudes throughout the world - not only what they actually are, but also strategies for their detection, description and classification. Researchers in the field seek to identify both similarities and differences. In this work, quantitative and qualitative views and methods are explored by nine well-known authors: Masamichi Sasaki, current President of the International Institute of Sociology; Theodore Caplow of the University of Virginia; Mattei Dogan of the National Center of Scientific Research, Paris; S.N. Eisenstadt of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Chikio Hayashi of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo; Geert Hofstede of the University of Limburg at Maastricht in The Netherlands; Alex Inkeles of Stanford University; P. Herbert Leiderman of the Stanford University Medical School; Robert M. Marsh of Brown University; and Carmi Schooler of the National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, USA.
Elites come in many forms and express themselves in an extraordinary variety of ways. This collection reflects just that diversity. From an overview of elites for the relatively uninitiated to comparative studies of elites in individual, national, social and political contexts, this work is both historical and contemporary, and encompasses a variety of case studies of elite individuals as well as elites in a broad range of national and political environments. All this is intended to assist those interested in the study of elites from historical and contemporary theoretical and empirical perspectives. Ultimately, this volume suggests many opportunities for further study and research.
This book is a collection of notable papers from the first six volumes of the journal Comparative Sociology. Its content represents leading-edge and contemporarily astute analyses in the burgeoning science of comparative sociology, especially relevant to a globalizing world in transition. Given that not everyone is acquainted with comparative sociology, this book offers an opportunity to enlighten readers unfamiliar with the discipline about the importance of comparative sociology to the new world order. Taken together, the articles illuminate various aspects of comparative sociology—theoretical, methodological, substantive. Some compare social entities in subjective, case-study fashion, while others report on rigorous social research. All contribute in one form or another to describing the many and varied facets of the exciting “new” science of comparative sociology.

Contributors are Margit Bussmann, Cristina Corduneanu-Huci, Mattei Dogan, Janet Harkness, Kristen R. Heimdal, Sharon K. Houseknecht, Ho-fung Hung, Ronald Inglehart, Valeriy Khmelko, Melvin L. Kohn, Robert M. Marsh, Peter Ph. Mohler, Pippa Norris, John R. Oneal, Noriko Onodera, Maryjane Osa, Vladimir I. Paniotto, Masamichi Sasaki, Shalom H. Schwartz, Tom W. Smith, Indra de Soysa, Tatsuzo Suzuki, Erich Weede, Brigitte Weiffen, and Masato Yoneda.

The content of this volume has previously been published in Comparative Sociology volumes 1 – 6.3.
In: Trust in Contemporary Society