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Classical Sociology Beyond Methodological Nationalism defends classical sociology from the accusation of ‘methodological nationalism’. To reject such accusation, the volume presents three arguments. The first contends that classical sociology has not failed to deal with the global world (Part I). The second, that classical sociology has more frequently dealt with the transnational category of the ‘social’, rather than with the ‘national’ (Part II). The third, that where classical sociology has analysed national society, the latter has never been envisaged as a rigidly confined entity within its political boundaries (Part III). The outcome is a re-evaluation of classical sociological thought as a more functional tool for analysing the political forms of modernity in the era of globalisation.

Contributors include: Vittorio Cotesta, David Inglis, Austin Harrington, Massimo Pendenza, Michael Schillmeier, Emanuela Susca, Dario Verderame, and Federico Trocini.
In: Classical Sociology Beyond Methodological Nationalism
In: Classical Sociology Beyond Methodological Nationalism
In: Classical Sociology Beyond Methodological Nationalism

Since 2008, the European crisis, in its many forms, has brought about an increase in inequality and has loosened the social bonds between EU citizens. It is the young who have been hit hardest by the consequences of the crisis, as much in the short term as in the long term. One would reasonably expect the European crisis to have affected young people’s sense of belonging to Europe and to the EU. We will deal with this issue from the perspective of cosmopolitanism. In particular, this article, based on data from two surveys conducted in 2014 and 2018 among young university students in southern Italy, will attempt to ascertain whether the crisis is the background for young people’s changed ‘cosmopolitan openness’ (their sense of belonging and attitude to other people), their ideas about Europe, and the depth and manner of their support for the EU; it looks at those dimensions, both jointly and separately, bringing out the finer points. While cosmopolitan feelings and support for the EU do not seem to have changed to any great extent among the young people interviewed, they are far from presenting a homogeneous group as regards their views on diversity, Europe, and their support for the European Union.

In: Youth and Globalization