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  • Author or Editor: Matej Nikšič x
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Abstract

This chapter focuses on the use of digital technologies in urban regeneration processes at the scale of the neighbourhood. Between 1950 and 1980, hundreds of neighbourhoods were built all over Europe, and the planning principles underlying them were also used in urban regeneration projects of rundown historical areas. With few exceptions, the planned urban neighbourhoods started to face social and economic problems a few decades after their construction. They became the scene of reconstruction and revitalization processes that usually take the scale of the original neighbourhood as their starting point. Contemporary regeneration approaches proposed for those areas are not limited to the physical and functional improvements; they put much attention to the existing communities, their needs, and aspirations. Cooperation between professionals and residents has become of paramount importance. The increased complexity of the neighbourhood-improvement programmes demands an interdisciplinary approach that addresses urgent issues, such as the ageing population, (un)healthy living environments, climate-change adaptation, etc. Where different professions get engaged with the residents, speaking a common language is crucial from the initial phase of setting the grounds. One of the major obstacles planners in neighbourhood regeneration processes encounter is how to connect citizen knowledge to their professional expertise. Interactions and visualizations based on information and communications technology (ICT) can help to create a common language, offering a realistic impression of the desired results of interventions and their impact on safety, health and well-being. This chapter offers insights into the case studies from Groningen, Ljubljana and Lyon.

Open Access
In: Placemaking in Practice Volume 1

Abstract

Interests of young people are neither often well considered in public spaces nor in decisions about the environment around them. One of the most important achievements of growing from childhood to adulthood is the development of one’s own social life and increasing one’s autonomy, which also means a widening of one’s spatial range of action. Despite these spatial needs and benefits for their own development, teenagers are often treated with suspicion in public spaces. One will often find them in large groups, standing around, chatting loudly with one another or playing around. Spatial needs, appropriation and practices, on the one side, and social norms, on the other side, do not necessarily match. In an inclusive city, spatial consumption and production is part of a dialogue with citizens, including vulnerable, “undesirable” and marginalized groups, in order to guarantee them not only the access to public spaces, but also their involvement in planning and decision-making processes. Studies show that young people have a great potential to bring unique insights to the built environment. This chapter explores the potential of young people to be involved in placemaking, reflecting on challenges facing such involvement and taking into account the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. Backed by studies in Cork, Lisbon, Ljubljana, Stockholm and Volos, it addresses the question how to use placemaking to change the city into a more inclusive and responsive environment for young people. These cases demonstrate that placemaking can be used as a tool for engaging young people in the decision-making process about their city and local environment, collating evidence-based research on the relationship between young people and public spaces.

Open Access
In: Placemaking in Practice Volume 1